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AAJP Vol. 8, No. 3, featuring “Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities” by Milner and Kim

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | September 2017 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities
by Uma Chandrika Millner and Min Kim

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the September 2017 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the September 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner

Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner works as a Research Scientist at Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and recently joined Lesley University as Assistant Professor. Social justice and multiculturalism form the foundations of her work. Her research interests focus on the community engagement of diverse groups of individuals with psychiatric disabilities with a specific focus on work and employment and Asian mental health.

 

Reflections from the Lead Author

While exploring ideas for his postdoctoral project, Dr. Min Kim first proposed a replication of my Meaning of Work (MoW) study with Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities. In response, I recall insisting “Let’s make this as simple and uncomplicated as possible.” The MoW study had a complex design combining consensual qualitative research procedures (CQR) with a participatory component. Anyone who has trained and supervised peers in conducting CQR procedures will know how I felt. With large gaps in the psychosocial rehabilitation literature on Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities, it can be rather tempting to conduct a behemoth of a project. As a researcher from a minority background, it is really hard to resist this temptation. So instead, I insisted on an unambitious study design with a quick turnaround time. We finally agreed on a study that would build on the MoW project and compare the work perspectives of Asian American and White Americans with psychiatric disabilities. However, “simple” turned out to be far more complicated. We could not find a reliable and valid instrument to meet our needs. On top of that, we could not shake the compelling desire to represent the lived experiences of Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities without which the study just did not seem complete. Hence, the final version of our project evolved to being a mixed methods study that included instrument development, group comparison, and qualitative inquiry procedures. I suppose some lessons in life are not easily learned. To quote Master Oogway (Kungfu Panda), “One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it.” The art of simplicity is definitely a work in progress for me . Nonetheless, we are very pleased to be able to share our work and bring this project to the next level. Dr. Kim is already developing the instrument further and we are working on plans to address the community integration needs of Asian American individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

 

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 3 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Perspectives on Work and Work-Related Challenges Among Asian Americans With Psychiatric Disabilities [Free download of article]
Uma Chandrika Millner, and Min Kim

Does Emotion Regulation Moderate the Discrimination-Adjustment Link for Adopted Korean American Adolescents? Yekun Qin, Adam Y. Kim, Jenny C. Su, Alison W. Hu, and Richard M. Lee

Latent Profiles of Acculturation and Their Implications for Health: A Study With Asian Americans in Central Texas.
Yuri Jang, Nan Sook Park, David A. Chiriboga, and Miyong T. Kim

Traumatic Experiences and Associated Symptomatology in Asian American Middle School Students.
Elizabeth Davies-Mercier, Michelle W. Woodbridge, W. Carl Sumi, S. Patrick Thornton, Katrina D. Roundfield, Terrence Lee-St. John, Kristen M.Rouspil, and Jennifer Yu

Help-Seeking and Coping Behaviors Among Asian Americans: The Roles of Asian Values, Emotional Intelligence, and Optimism.
Nina Lei, and John Pellitteri

Searching for Connection—Finding Resolution: A Grounded Theory Analysis of Writings of Korean American Adopted Adults.
Oh Myo Kim, Kevin C.Hynes, and Richard M. Lee

The Response to Rural-to-Urban Migration and Other Life Stressors in Shanghai: Effects on Physical and Psychological Well-Being Among Parents of Young Children
Wen-Jui Han, Judith Siegel, and Liwei Zhang

 


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/09/19/aajp-vol-8-no-3-…y-milner-and-kim/
For more information on AAJPhttp://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychologybryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP Vol. 8, No. 2, featuring “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization” by Thai et al

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2017 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization
by Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2017 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Christina J. Thai, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Christina J. Thai

Christina J. Thai graduated from James Madison University in 2013 with bachelor’s degrees in biology and psychology. Christina was a member of JMU’s Cultural and Racial Diversity Studies (CARDS) Lab for three years. As a research assistant, she worked on several projects, including one examining the relationship between Asian Americans’ phenotypic characteristics and experiences of racial microaggressions. After graduation, Christina attended Loyola University Maryland, where she received a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology. With the guidance of her advisor, Dr. Heather Lyons, Christina successfully completed her thesis on the role of racial socialization as a moderator for experiences of racial microaggressions and self-esteem in Asian American emerging adults. She is now a Counseling Psychology Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland and is a member of the Culture, Race, and Health Lab working with Dr. Matt Miller. When Christina isn’t otherwise occupied as a die-hard Pittsburgh Penguin fan or an amateur Netflix critic she is busy creating a business plan for her potato themed food truck. Christina hopes to continue studying racial socialization and is currently developing her dissertation idea.

Reflections from the Lead Author

When we were asked to reflect on the interesting, fun, or challenging experiences we encountered while writing up this study we thought of many – traveling to present our research, working with a smart and fun team, and emailing and skyping one another constantly. We also reflected on a parallel process we experienced when submitting this study on microaggressions for presentation at a research event at our home institution. Our peer reviewers responded that they would be happy to include our poster in the research event, after we changed references to “microaggressions” to “perceived microaggressions” without asking that we make a similar change to the other study variables that were also measured using self report. Fortunately, around the same time we received feedback on our submission, Dr. Kira Hudson Banks had published “’Perceived’ discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology” in the American Psychologist. Dr. Banks’ article allowed us to ground our reaction to the review in research and even a bit of humor. According to Dr. Banks “Aliens, extraterrestrial beings, and phantom limbs are ‘perceived’” (p. 312). Asking that we insert the word “perceived” for only one study variable might have two consequences. Like phantom limbs, readers might recognize microaggressions as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver. Second, as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver it also removes a perpetrator from the interaction. This experience, and the insights Dr. Banks facilitated, helped us understand the importance of continuing to present and publish on microaggressions to bolster understanding and credibility of this construct.

Banks, K. H. (2014). “Perceived” discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology. American Psychologist, 69, 311–313. doi:10.1037/a0035734

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization [Free download of article]
Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

Reciprocal Relations Between Social Self-Efficacy and Loneliness Among Chinese International Students
William Tsai, Kenneth T. Wang, and Meifen Wei

Social Anxiety in Asian Americans: Integrating Personality and Cultural Factors 
J. Hannah Lee and A. Timothy Church

Parenting Variables Associated With Growth Mindset: An Examination of Three Chinese-Heritage Samples 
Joanna J. Kim, Joey Fung, Qiaobing Wu, Chao Fang, and Anna S. Lau

Loss of Face, Intergenerational Family Conflict, and Depression Among Asian American and European American College Students 
Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T. L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, and Yang Chen

Mental-Illness Stigma Among Korean Immigrants: Role of Culture and Destigmatization Strategies 
Meekyung Han, Rachel Cha, Hyun Ah Lee, and Sang E. Lee

Developing Minority Leaders: Key Success Factors of Asian Americans 
Thomas Sy, Susanna Tram-Quon, and Alex Leung

An Examination of Attitudes Toward Gender and Sexual Violence Among Asian Indians in the United States
Pratyusha Tummala-Narra, Jaclyn Houston-Kolnik, Nina Sathasivam-Rueckert, and Megan Greeson

MMPI-2 Profiles Among Asian American Missionary Candidates: Gendered Comparisons for Ethnicity and Population Norms
Christopher H. Rosik, Grecia Rosel, Meg M. Slivoskey, Katie M. Ogdon, Ian K. Roos, Tiffany M. Kincaid, and Mandalyn R. Castanon


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/06/03/aajp-vol-8-no-2/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP Special Issue – Call for Papers: Asian Americans and Suicide

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Call for Papers: Asian Americans and Suicide

 

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2017

 

Special Issue Editors

Frederick Leong, PhD, Joyce Chu, PhD, and Shashank Joshi, MD

 

The Asian American Journal of Psychology is extending an invitation for manuscripts to be considered for a special issue on Asian Americans and suicide.

 

The goal of this special issue is to detail the current state of knowledge and gaps about suicide in Asian American communities, and to highlight innovative approaches to suicide prevention and management for Asian Americans through a culturally informed lens.

 

Topics include, but are not limited to,

  • expansion of the current knowledge base about the problem of suicide in Asian American communities
  • ways to increase our understanding of the development of suicidal ideation and behaviors, the expression of suicidal distress or behaviors, means or methods of suicide, or culturally informed meanings of suicide
  • understudied or innovative clinical or community approaches to prevent and manage suicide

 

Manuscripts that address suicide in understudied Asian American subgroups (e.g., Hmong, Laotian, Vietnamese, and Cambodian) are particularly welcome. Varied methodologies, particularly suicide note analysis or research on Asian American suicide decedents, are also of particular interest.

 

Empirical (quantitative and qualitative) papers, meta-analytic/review papers, and theoretical-based papers are all welcomed for submission.

 

The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2017.

 

This special issue endeavors to make timely and important contributions to burgeoning questions about heightened or growing suicide ideation, behaviors, and deaths among Asian American subgroups, and to provide guidance for community and clinical efforts to curtail the problem of suicide in Asian American populations.

 

Please follow the submission guidelines located on the Asian American Journal of Psychology website.

 

Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through the Manuscript Submission portal. Please specify in your cover letter that the submission is intended for the special section on Asian Americans and suicide.

 

All papers submitted will be initially screened by the guest editors and then sent out for blind peer review, if evaluated as appropriate for the journal.

 

For further questions related to this special issue, please contact Frederick Leong, Joyce Chu, or Shashank Joshi.

AAJP Vol. 8, No. 1 Special Issue: Moving Beyond the Model Minority

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | March 2017 Issue
Description and Table of Contents

SPECIAL ISSUE: Moving Beyond the Model Minority 

This special issue of AAJP represents a collaborative effort with the Society for Research in Child Development’s Asian Caucus Steering Committee (Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Lisa Kiang, and Yijie Wang), with Virginia Huynh and Lisa Kiang serving as lead guest editors. The collection of articles in this issue represents diverse methodologies, with a common aim of further understanding the development of Asian Americans beyond the confines of the Model Minority Stereotype and inspiring new conceptual and empirical approaches. We hope that readers will find the articles in this special issue to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Introduction to this Special Issue may be downloaded for free here, and the Table of Contents is below.

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 1 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION: Moving beyond the model minority. [Free download of article]
Kiang, Lisa; Huynh, Virginia W.; Cheah, Charissa S. L.; Wang, Yijie; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

Hyper-selectivity and the remaking of culture: Understanding the Asian American achievement paradox.
Zhou, Min; Lee, Jennifer

Academic social support and student expectations: The case of second-generation Asian Americans.
Cherng, Hua-Yu Sebastian; Liu, Jia-Lin

Are they political? Examining Asian American college students’ civic engagement.
Wray-Lake, Laura; Tang, Julia; Victorino, Christine

Losing Kapwa: Colonial legacies and the Filipino American family.
David, E. J. R.; Sharma, Dinghy Kristine B.; Petalio, Jessica

Disentangling the myth: Social relationships and Filipino American adolescents’ experiences of the model minority stereotype.
Rodriguez-Operana, Victoria C.; Mistry, Rashmita S.; Chen, Yu Jung

Stigma consciousness, racial microaggressions, and sleep disturbance among Asian Americans.
Ong, Anthony D.; Cerrada, Christian; Lee, Rebecca A.; Williams, David R.


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/05/01/aajp-vol-8-no-1/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP Vol. 7, No. 4 featuring “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015” by Kiang et al.

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | December 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Lisa Kiang

Dr. Lisa Kiang

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015
by Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Lisa Kiang, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the December 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

Reflections from the Lead Author
I have sort of a love-hate relationship with technology, and my emotions certainly fluctuated to the extremes while collaborating on this paper. To start, though, I am deeply grateful to have had the opportunity to take on the important and enormous challenge of reviewing the outstanding research on Asian Americans published in 2015. It was rewarding and inspiring to see the quality of cutting-edge research focusing on this distinctive population. And in terms of sheer quantity, coordinating the coding, summary, review, and synthesis of hundreds upon hundreds of articles is no small feat and would never have been possible without the help from my small, but mighty, research lab and from my co-authors from the SRCD Asian Caucus. Indeed, one of the biggest tasks in working on this project was figuring out how to manage the process of coding articles for inclusion in the review. After consulting with one of my university’s reference librarians early on, I decided that using a combination of EbscoHost folders and Zotero would be one of the best ways to filter through abstracts and identify the final set of articles that met the criteria for inclusion—and this is where the “hate” comes in. These software programs and I had some words during the coding process, some pretty nasty words. And there were tears, mostly on my part. Some fists were even raised. Yet, in the end, glitches were resolved, inconsistencies were addressed, and no severe damage was done. After completing this project, Zotero and I decided we would take a little bit of break from each other, spend some time apart, but I think we’ll still be friends. The “love” aspect of my relationship with technology can be illustrated by the fact that much of the preparation and writing of this paper was handled internationally. I had the great fortune to teach in Vienna, Austria during the Spring of 2016 (more detailed teaching escapades can be found at http://www.s-r-a.org/announcements/blog/2016-05-17-teaching-semester-vienna-connecting-cultural-experiences-class-concept). Through technology, I was able to very efficiently and effectively communicate with my coding team and co-authors, whether it be via e-mails, electronic servers, shared folders, or online communication platforms. These days, it no longer seems remarkable to hold a meeting when attendees are distributed across multiple states and two or more continents, but it is the beauty and power of technology that makes such collaboration feasible and fun.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015 [Free download of article]
Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

Asian American Men’s Internalization of Western Media Appearance Ideals, Social Comparison, and Acculturative Stress
Brian TaeHyuk Keum

Parent-Child Closeness and Acculturation in Predicting Racial Preference in Mate Selection among Asian Americans 
Quyen T. Sklar, Jenny H. Pak, and Stacy Eltiti

Big 5 Personality and Subjective Well-Being in Asian Americans: Testing Optimism and Pessimism as Mediators
P. Priscilla Lui, David Rollock, Edward C. Chang, Frederick F. T. Leong, and Byron L. Zamboanga

Does Endorsement of the Model Minority Myth Relate to Anti-Asian Sentiments among White College Students? The Role of a Color-blind Racial Attitude
Sarah J. Parks and Hyung Chol Yoo

Associations among Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Trust in Provider, and Treatment Adherence among Predominantly Low-Income Asian American Patients
Shuchang Kang, Carolyn M. Tucker, Guillermo M. Wippold, Michael Marsiske, and Paige H. Wegener


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2016/11/04/aajp-vol-7-no-4/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu