Category

AAJP

AAJP September 2015 Feature Article and TOC

By | AAJP, Announcements, Member Spotlight, Research | No Comments

The Asian American Journal of Psychology (AAJP) Editorial Board is pleased to share the contents of the September 2015 issue. The Feature Article for this issue is Racial Identity Profiles of Asian‐White Biracial Young Adults: Testing a Theoretical Model With Cultural and Psychological Correlates.

Dr. Chong was interviewed by AAPA and Division on Students member, Chak Wong. Learn more about Dr. Chong and the inspiration for this study below. You can also peruse the rest of the issue’s Table of Contents.

Q & A with Dr. Vanessa Chong 

Dr. Vanessa Chong

Dr. Vanessa Chong

General Background:
Dr. Vanessa Chong, PhD grew up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and attended graduate school for Clinical Psychology at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, where she became interested in cross-cultural research. Particularly, her master’s thesis explored the perceived acculturation discrepancies between Asian-Canadian young adults and their parents how family variables correlated with psychological adjustment. Her Asian-White biracial Canadian identity sparked further exploration of the extent to which Asian-White biracial experiences are similar and different from monoracial Asian individuals. In collaboration with her supervisor, Dr. Ben Kuo PhD, a full professor at the University of Windsor, her doctoral research (a portion of which was recently published in the AAJP) utilized a mixed methods study to investigate the interrelationships between biracial identity, family variables, psychological adjustment, and internalized oppression. Currently, she is working as a Clinical Psychologist in a community mental health clinic in Calgary.

How did you become interested in this topic?
Psychology researchers are known for studying themselves, and I was no exception! I primarily became interested in this topic due to my own experiences with growing up as a biracial individual. Although interracial marriages and biracial children are becoming increasingly common, when I was growing up, my sister and I were the only biracial kids in our school. Being biracial truly shaped our growing up years. I can vividly remember an encounter when I was about 6 when my sister and I were in a mall and a homeless man insisted on giving us each $5 “for the children of Vietnam.” He had assumed that our White mother must have adopted us because we didn’t look like her! I have always been curious about whether other biracial people had similar experiences.

Can you tell us a little bit about your current line of research?
In my current work I am primarily a clinician, but I believe that an important part of being a good Psychologist is applying research to clinical practice. I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a number of clients from various ethnic backgrounds, including some biracial clients. I think it is especially important to discuss and normalize the biracial identity development process in therapy, as it can sometimes be complicated and challenging. There are some experiences that are unique to biracial individuals and should be discussed in therapy,. Coming to terms with one’s racial identity is a therapy goal that can be overlooked. In addition, my research looks at internalized oppression. I find it interesting that this is a relatively common experience among both monoracial minorities and biracial individuals, yet there is relatively little research on this topic. What’s more, it is a topic that clients may not bring up in therapy, as they may have shame associated with it. In the future, I may consider publishing some really interesting qualitative data on internalized oppression from my dissertation.

Any interesting tidbits you would like to share?
My research on Asian-White biracial individuals has been a really personally meaningful endeavor. I was able to collect a large amount of data from a fairly large sample (330 participants) from all over the US and Canada in a span of only three months. My participants were eager to answer questions about their experiences, and I actually received several messages thanking me for doing this research. I think this is because biracial people are so rarely studied and a common experience for biracial people involves feeling overlooked and not included. I feel honored that I was able to give them a voice through my research. In doing this research, I also felt increasingly connected to a community of people that I didn’t even know I was part of! This research helped me in my own journey of biracial identity development and, because of that, it will always hold a special place in my heart.

(Interview by Chak Wong, AAPA and Division on Students Member)

 


 

ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
Table of Contents – June 2015

Feature Article: Racial Identity Profiles of Asian‐White Biracial Young Adults: Testing a Theoretical Model With Cultural and Psychological Correlates
Vanessa Chong and Ben C.H. Kuo

Moderating Effects of Perceived Language Discrimination on Mental Health Outcomes Among Chinese International Students
Meifen Wei; Ya-Shu Liang; Yi Du; Raquel Botello and Chun-I Li

Asian Values, Personal and Family Perfectionism, and Mental Health Among Asian Indians in the United States
Bindu Methikalam; Kenneth T. Wang; Robert B. Slaney and Jeffrey G. Yeung

Maternal Meta‐Emotion and Child Socio‐Emotional Functioning In Immigrant Indian and White American Families
Suchi S. Daga; Vaishali V. Raval and Stacey P. Raj

Asian American Phenotypicality and Experiences of Psychological Distress: More Than Meets the Eyes
Matthew Lee and Christina J. Thai

Changes in Academic Aspirations and Expectations Among Asian American Adolescents
Lisa Kiang; Melissa Witkow; Laura Gonzalez; Gabriela Stein and Kandace Andrews

The Sociocultural Context of Caregiving Experiences for Vietnamese Dementia Family Caregivers
Oanh L. Meyer; Kim Hanh Nguyen; To Nhu Dao; Phuoc Vu; Patricia Arean and Ladson Hinton

Pathways Among Asian Americans’ Family Ethnic Socialization, Ethnic Identity, and Psychological Well‐Being: A Multigroup Mediation Model
Chi P. Nguyen; Y. Joel Wong; Linda Juang and Irene J.K. Park

A Long‐Term Therapeutic Journey With an Asian “Parachute Kid”
Teresa A. Mok

Book Review: Brown Skin, White Minds: Filipino‐American Postcolonial Psychology
Gauthamie Poolokasingham

Convention News: Schedule now available, Clinicians & Researchers coming together

By | AAJP, Announcements, Convention, News, Practice, Research | No Comments

Convention News Highlights:

  • Register by July 21st! Prices go up for on-site registration.
  • Want to plan your Convention day? Download the schedule.
  • Researchers & clinicians are invited to join together at a special lunchtime networking session, titled “Writing Case Studies: Highlighting Practice-Based Evidence and Evidence-Based Practice.” The event, co-sponsored by the Asian American Journal of Psychology and the AAPA Practice Task Force, will discuss the journal’s new guidelines for case study submissions. For more information:
    • Are you a clinically-oriented researcher seeking to increase your publication record and collaborate with research-oriented clinicians?
    • Are you a clinician with interesting case material to share but limited time and resources to publish?

Case studies provide practical examples of culturally-informed approaches to service delivery that can be evaluated alongside the research literature to inform treatment decisions. In a growing field such as Asian American psychology, case studies also may be especially helpful for exploring understudied phenomena and generating hypotheses that may be explored in future research. We encourage participants to come prepared to discuss ideas for case studies and present areas of expertise that they could contribute to the shaping of others’ case studies. Students are welcome!

In this lunchtime interactive session, we will:
1. Present the guidelines and requirements for submission of case studies to the AAJP Case Study Section.

2. Develop ideas for case studies highlighting innovative approaches to service delivery involving Asian Americans.

3. Provide opportunities to network and meet potential collaborators that can help bridge gaps in research and clinical practice.

TO REGISTER: Email the AAJP Case Study Section Editor, Doris F. Chang, at changd@newschool.edu and provide the following information:

1. Name and job title
2. Area of expertise
3. What kinds of case studies would you be interested in working on? (Examples: case studies involving kids and families; treatment of depression; spiritually-focused interventions; applications of mindfulness)
4. What kind of concrete assistance would be helpful? (Examples: information about the latest research on X to help ground my literature review; access to library databases or statistical help; consultation on a case formulation; help with taking my case notes and turning them into a paper; someone to edit my work)
5. What kind of assistance can you provide?
6. Do you have an idea for a case study that you wish to workshop or discuss during the session? (Y/N)

AAJP’s June 2015 Feature Article: “Perceived Discrimination, Intergenerational Family Conflicts, and Depressive Symptoms in Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Asian American Emerging Adults”

By | AAJP, Announcements, Research | 2 Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol 6 No 2, (June 2015) Feature Article: Perceived Discrimination, Intergenerational Family Conflicts, and Depressive Symptoms in Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Asian American Emerging Adults by Hsiu-Lan Cheng (New Mexico State University), Shu-Ping Lin (Tamkang University, New Taipei City, Taiwan) & Chu Hui Cha (New Mexico State University)

Hsiu-Lan Cheng, first author of the AAJP June 2015 issue's feature article

Hsiu-Lan Cheng, first author of the AAJP June 2015 issue’s feature article

Do you think your perspective or experiences of being racially discriminated are different from those of your family members, particularly those from a different generation? Has such difference ever led to disagreement or conflicts? How do you think these types of experience, either of being discriminated or in conflicts with your family, affect your mental health? As the sociocultural and political conversations on racial discrimination rage on in America in 2015, one does not have to look far to discover the long and elaborate streams of literature detailing the negative psychological consequences of discrimination. Against this backdrop, Cheng, Lin, and Cha (2015) extend these streams in the current June 2015 issue of the Asian American Journal of Psychology. Cheng and colleagues broaden our knowledge on the mechanisms through which discrimination negatively impacts mental health among Asian American and immigrant college students. Recognizing the interrelated and dynamic nature of contextual factors at various levels, Dr. Cheng and her colleagues cleverly hypothesize family conflict as a mediation between discrimination and depressive symptoms.

Drawing from her five years of clinical experiences as a staff psychologist at a large university counseling center before transitioning to a research-oriented academic career and also from personal experience as a first-generation immigrant, Dr. Cheng understood very well how intergenerational conflicts represent a powerful and complex influence particularly in Asian American and immigrant families where these issues are further compounded by identity development as racial minorities. Different individuals and different generations approach racial identity development in distinctive ways and the resulting dissonance in this process potentially contributes to family conflicts. Racial discrimination then embodies a prime example of intergenerational disagreement, which, like experiences of discrimination, also predicts more depressive symptoms.

This article is a fascinating read if you are interested in how different levels of ecological factors can influence each other, in a mediational fashion in this instance, to ultimately influence mental health on the individual level. Other specific explorations in the study included investigating both father and mother and at both first and second generation Asian immigrant and Americans differentially. More generally, the article also succinctly yet thoroughly reviews some of the most recent literature on associations between perceived discrimination, family conflict, and depression. So help yourself stay informed on the latest findings on how race relates to family and mental health!

Feature written by Ming-Che Tu, Chair of AAPA’s Division of Students, for Asian American Psychological Association

The latest Table of Contents can be accessed here: http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=browsePA.volumes&jcode=aap

AAJP June 2015 Table of Contents

By | AAJP, Announcements, News | No Comments

The Asian American Journal of Psychology (AAJP) Editorial Board is pleased to share the Table of Contents for AAJP’s June 2015 issue.

ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
Table of Contents – June 2015

Perceived Discrimination, Intergenerational Family Conflicts, and Depressive Symptoms in Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Asian American Emerging Adults                                
Hsiu-Lan Cheng, New Mexico State University; Shu-Ping Lin, Tamkang University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; Chu Hui Cha, New Mexico State University

Predicting Performance Outcomes From the Manner of Stereotype Activation and Stereotype Content
Margaret Shih, University of California-Los Angeles; Daryl A. Wout, John Jay College, City University of New York; Mariam Hambarchyan, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business

Exploring Effects of Social Justice Youth Programming on Racial and Ethnic Identities and Activism for Asian American Youth
Karen L. Suyemoto, University of Massachusetts Boston; Stephanie C. Day , University of Houston, Clear Lake; Sarah Schwartz, University of Massachusetts Boston

Racial Microaggressions and Asian Americans: An Exploratory Study on Within-Group Differences and Mental Health    
Kevin L. Nadal, Yinglee Wong, Julie Sriken, Katie Griffin, & Whitney Fujii-Doe, John Jay College of Criminal Justice – City University of New York

Fostering Social Support, Leadership Competence, Community Engagement, and Resilience Among Samoan American Youth   
Christine J. Yeh, University of San Francisco; Noah E. Borrero; University of San Francisco; Catherine Lusheck, University of San Francisco; Luis Placencia, University of San Francisco; Saline Kilano, Samoan Community Development Center; Maryangel Mase, Samoan Community Development Center; Tautalatasi Suesue Jr., Samoan Community Development Center; Patsy Tito, Samoan Community Development Center

Ethnic Identity as a Moderator Against Discrimination for Transracially and Transnationally Adopted Korean American Adolescents
Joyce P. Lee, Richard M. Lee, Alison W. Hu, & Oh Myo Kim, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Normative Changes in Meaning in Life and Links to Adjustment in Adolescents From Asian American Backgrounds
Lisa Kiang, Wake Forest University; Melissa R. Witkow, Willamette University

Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Environment and Depressive Symptoms in Older Korean Americans: Do Chronic Disease and Functional Disability Modify It?
Nan Sook Park, University of South Florida; Yuri Jang, The University of Texas at Austin; Beom S. Lee, University of South Florida; David A. Chiriboga, University of South Florida

Feasibility of Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Incarcerated Mixed-Ethnic Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Youth
Thao N. Le, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Jeff Proulx, Oregon State University

Korean American Adolescent Ethnic-Identity Pride and Psychological Adjustment: Moderating Effects of Parental Support and School Environment
Tzu-Fen Chang, Michigan State University; Eun-Jin Han, Michigan State University; Jin-Suk Lee, Chonbuk National University; Desiree B. Qin, Michigan State University 

Internalized Oppression: The Psychology of Marginalized Groups Edited by E.J.R. David – Book review
Jennifer Abe, Loyola Marymount University

Call for Papers on Asian Americans & Positive Psychology

By | AAJP, Announcements, News, Research | One Comment

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Dear Colleagues,

We are soliciting manuscripts to be featured in a special issue of the Asian American Journal of Psychology with the theme being “Asian Americans and Positive Psychology.”

The general focus will be on how positive psychology has impacted the study of Asian Americans, and how the study of Asian Americans has impacted positive psychology. We are particularly interested in works that offer new or innovative perspectives on a number of important topics,

  • including the importance of Asian Americans to positive psychology,
  • the usefulness of measuring unique Asian American strengths,
  • examining models of positive psychology for Asian Americans, and
  • the application of positive psychology practice/interventions in working with Asian Americans.

Although we are open to considering all types of scientific submissions, we are particularly interested in those that have a strong empirical basis.

Deadline for submissions is July 31, 2015.

All submissions for the special issue will undergo the same review process as any other manuscript submitted to Asian American Journal of Psychology. Submit manuscripts though the Manuscript Submission Portal.

Drs. Edward Chang and Paul Kwon will serve as Co-Editors for this special issue.

Because there may be other special issues in progress, it is important to appreciate that it may take a year or more before this special issue is published. Please feel free to contact any one of us (emails listed below) if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

Edward C. Chang, Ph.D.,
Professor of Psychology
University of Michigan
changec@umich.edu

Paul Kwon, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor of Psychology
Washington State University
kwonp@wsu.edu

Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D.
Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology
bryankim@hawaii.edu

The link for the Call for Papers and submission portal can be found at: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/aap/call-for-papers-asian-americans-positive-psychology.aspx