All Posts By

Ming-Che Tu

AAPA Statement on Family Separation at the Southern US Border

By | Announcements, Press Release, Statements | No Comments

The mission of AAPA is to advance the mental health and well-being of Asian American communities. In response to community and world events, AAPA has found it necessary to ally with other communities, as it is impossible to function as an ethical body if we speak solely about issues of health and policy that directly impact Asian Americans or behavioral and mental health professionals. AAPA is committed to the promotion of health and equity for the benefit of all, particularly those most vulnerable. As an organization whose members are comprised of immigrants and descendants of immigrants, we are particularly pained by the events witnessed at the southern U.S. border, which reveals breaches in international standards for children’s rights (https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx).

Decades of psychological research on child and caregiver attachment unequivocally demonstrate the crucial role of attachment in child health and well-being. In particular, disrupted caregiver attachment for children under age 5 contributes to lifelong negative developmental consequences. The psychological impact of family separation policies as well as inhumane detention conditions is causing needless and irreparable harm to migrant children. Prolonged exposure to the stressors of such conditions can cause both short and long term health consequences (https://www.srcd.org/policy-media/statements-evidence/separating-families).

AAPA is a non-partisan organization that promotes mental health; this includes the welfare of children. We advocate for a world that supports health and ethical practices. This mission is even more urgent when those enduring harm are children who are unable to care for themselves—children who are separated from their adult caregivers and without the supervision of qualified pediatric and psychological experts. We stand firmly with other professional organizations (such as the American Psychological Association, American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of Social Workers) against family separation as a matter of policy within the asylum process. In addition to the negative impact upon individual children and families, current policies threaten overall public health as explained by the American Public Health Association.

https://www.apha.org/policies-and-advocacy/public-health-policy-statements/policy-database/2019/01/29/separation-of-immigrant-and-refugee-children-and-families)

As a member organization of the National Council on Asian Pacific Americans, AAPA recommends the rejection of an enforcement-only approach to immigration. Such an approach only results in anti-immigrant initiatives, scapegoating of refugees, harmful family separations, and increased vulnerability of survivors of domestic violence, human trafficking and other crimes.

What can we do to help?

Speak Up.

Write an op-ed in your local paper, or send an email to your member of Congress about your concerns. 

You can call your representatives as well- 202-224-3121 and the switchboard will connect you to your local representatives. 

Ask to end the zero tolerance inhumane policies punishing families for seeking asylum.

Call upon the Federal Government to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Demand the appropriate use and maintenance of data to facilitate reunification of separated children and caretakers.

Share behavioral health facts and concerns within your personal and professional circles.

Act locally.

Volunteers are not allowed in detainment centers, but you can find out about your local refugee resettlement agencies and what they need here:

https://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/state-programs-annual-overview

Support Civil Rights

ACLU’s national site: https://www.aclu.org/action 

We call upon AAPA members to share their regional resources and allied programs as well.

AAJP Vol. 10 No. 2 featuring “Racist Experiences, Openness to Discussing Racism, and Attitudes toward Ethnic Heritage Activities: Adoptee-Parent Discrepancies” by Langrehr, Morgan, Ross, Oh, & Chong.

By | AAJP, Announcements | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2019 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Racist Experiences, Openness to Discussing Racism, and Attitudes toward Ethnic Heritage Activities: Adoptee-Parent Discrepancies
by Langrehr, Kimberly J.; Morgan, Sydney K.; Ross, Jessica; Oh, Monica; and Chong, Wen Wen.

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors for being chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2019 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Kimberly Langrehr, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Kimberly Langrehr

Kimberly Langrehr is an Associate Professor in the Division of Counseling and Educational Psychology at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC). She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Loyola University of Chicago and her undergraduate and master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. Langrehr’s research focuses on the context of socialization for post-modern families, implications of transnational adoption throughout the lifespan, and consciousness transformation. At UMKC, Dr. Langrehr also serves as the Director of Training for the Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology and teaches courses in Pluralistic Counseling, Counseling Methods, and Prevention and Consultation in Community Settings.

Reflections from the Lead Author

This project represents several firsts for me, which mostly center on collecting dyadic data and using hierarchical linear modeling as the primary data analysis. In particular, collecting data from both adoptees as well as from their parents was certainly time consuming and at times, quite complicated. In addition, up until this project, I hadn’t been involved in research on teens (minors) since I was in graduate school. Ultimately, I am fortunate for the assistance that I received from the family organizations that took part of this project. The success of this study reflects the importance of maintaining collaborative and working relationships with the communities that are at the center of our research.

AAJP VOLUME 10, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Racist experiences, openness to discussing racism, and attitudes toward ethnic heritage activities: Adoptee–parent discrepancies.
Langrehr, Kimberly J.; Morgan, Sydney K.; Ross, Jessica; Oh, Monica; Chong, Wen Wen.

Internalized racial oppression as a moderator of the relationship between experiences of racial discrimination and mental distress among Asians and Pacific Islanders.
Garcia, Gabriel M.; David, E. J. R.; Mapaye, Joy C.

Feeling good—and feeling bad—Affect social problem solving: A test of the broaden-and-build model in Asian Americans.
Wu, Kaidi; Chang, Edward C.

Acculturation and patriarchal beliefs among Asian American young adults: A preliminary investigation.
Yoon, Eunju; Cabirou, Latifat; Bhang, Cecile; Galvin, Sarah.

Peer victimization and the perpetual foreigner stereotype on Sikh American adolescents’ mental health outcomes: The moderating effects of coping and behavioral enculturation.
Do, Kieu Anh; Wang, Cixin; Atwal, Kavita.

“I’m not White, I have to be pretty and skinny”: A qualitative exploration of body image and eating disorders among Asian American women.
Javier, Sarah J.; Belgrave, Faye Z.

Mental illness stigmas in South Asian Americans: A cross-cultural investigation.
Chaudhry, Tahani; Chen, Stephen H.

School-based mental health for Asian American immigrant youth: Perceptions and recommendations.
Arora, Prerna G.; Algios, Alexa.

Context diversity predicts the extent to which the American identity is implicitly associated with Asian Americans and European Americans.
Devos, Thierry; Sadler, Melody.

#YouToo?
Hall, Christine C. Iijima.


For more information on AAJPhttp://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Chu Y. Kim-Prieto, Ph.D., Incoming Editor, AAJP kim@tcnj.edu

AAPA Statement Against Religious Hate Crimes

By | Announcements, Press Release, Statements | No Comments

We are horrified and grief-stricken by the multiple tragedies that have taken place in the last two weeks. AAPA leadership was still processing and working on our words of solidarity in response to the Sri Lanka murders (Sunday, April 21, 2019) when the shooting at the Chabad of Poway Synagogue (Saturday, April 27, 2019) occurred in San Diego, CA.

As an organization we unequivocally condemn such acts of hate and violence and commit to supporting victims, families, and communities during these difficult times.  For many individuals and communities religion and spirituality are fundamental components of psychological and community health. As such,  we are especially concerned about the persistent onslaught of violence impacting ethnic, racial, and religious communities both within the U.S. and abroad. We urge our membership to remain vigilant in considering the impact of losing a sense of safety in one’s spiritual home. Whether in Christchurch or Louisiana, Oak Creek or Pittsburgh- these cowardly attacks are an affront to us all.

As an organization committed to advancing the mental health and well-being of Asian Americans, we are cognizant of the media’s highlighting of mental illness as a precipitant to some of the tragedies. We are intent on differentiating mental health from acts of hate and violence. Facts indicate that the vast majority of those living with mental health conditions do not commit acts of violence.

In the wake of recent tragedies, we advise that each of us remain mindful not to give in to divisiveness by stereotyping entire communities for the hateful actions of a few. We also advise you to acknowledge history and systems of oppression that implicitly or explicitly perpetuate such hate and violence. We need to stand together, united in combating hatred and denouncing acts of violence.

If you or your family are impacted by these events, we encourage you to make yourself a priority and make space for your personal self-care and that of your community. We also encourage you to consider reaching out to your family, friends, religious and spiritual institutions, mental health professionals, and local community and support groups.

For allies and supporters, we encourage you to reach out to folks within your network to allow space for sharing, venting, grieving, fear, and any other emotions that might arise. Make your allyship local and visible. Note that it is important to provide validation for those communities most impacted. At this critical time, we encourage continuing to build a sense of strength through love and community– all of which have been shown to support healing and mental health.

In Solidarity,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

RESOURCES

Managing your Distress in the Wake of Mass Shooting

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting

Building Resilience to Manage Indirect Exposure to Terror

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/terror-exposure

How to talk to Children about difficult news

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/talking-to-children

HATE CRIME RESOURCES

American Psychological Association on the Psychology of Hate Crimes

https://www.apa.org/advocacy/interpersonal-violence/hate-crimes

Southern Poverty legal Center – Resources for Fighting Hate Groups and Teaching Tolerance

https://www.splcenter.org/teaching-tolerance

Southern Poverty legal Center -10 ways to fight hate – Community response

https://www.splcenter.org/20170814/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

SRI LANKA RESOURCES

Sri Lanka Red Cross

https://slredcross.give.asia/campaign/support-the-victims-of-sri-lanka-bombings

Kind Hearted Lankans

https://www.kindheartedlankans.com

If you need assistance with locating a missing relative, please contact your local Red Cross office here  and ask to speak to a case worker.

CHABAD POWAY DONATION SITE

https://www.chabadpoway.com/templates/fundraising/default_cdo/aid/4365672/jewish/Campaign.htm

2019 Annual Convention: Call for Proposals

By | Announcements, Call for Proposals, Convention | No Comments

MAKING WAVES AND BREAKING THROUGH THE BAMBOO CEILING: Reclaiming and Redefining Our Asian and Asian American Identities

This year’s theme building upon previous years’ themes of research, practice, and advocacy efforts with an increased focus on social justice advocacy and concrete actions to propel Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) mental health forward.

Often, culturally or via family norms, AANHPI are sent messages to keep our heads down, to conform, and to uphold the status quo. Dominant societal norms reinforce the bamboo ceiling by, restricting AANHPI achievements, and perpetuating the model minority stereotype that AANHPI individuals are studious, meek, and successful. These stereotypes are then used to keep us “visibly invisible” and minimize our experiences and needs. These dominant messages are also a divide and conquer strategy that encourages us to marginalize our own, thereby keeping the dominant power structures in place, maintaining the status quo, and preventing us from having our voices heard. Therefore, with this theme, we embrace and highlight our duty, joy, and responsibility to present our authentic selves and showcase our work in order to inspire change and promote equity.

“Making waves and breaking through the bamboo ceiling” is a call to spotlight our intersecting identities and values that enrich and strengthen our communities.  We seek to transcend outdated social norms while retaining our true selves and honoring our elders, mentors, ancestors, and allies. We gather to share the wisdom, creativity, and expertise of our own intersectional AANHPI communities from across the globe.

There is not only one definition of what it means to be Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and/or Pacific Islander. It is time for us as a community to create and define these terms and use advocacy to link with our communities beyond academia and clinical practice settings. Let us focus on ways to see and uplift each other and ourselves as enough. Let’s break down the barriers that have muted and divided us, and share strategies and wisdom as we move boldly forward together.

Abstract Submission Instructions

Proposals are due May 24, 2019 at 11:59 PM PST

IMPORTANT – READ:

**Proposals that address the convention theme will be prioritized**

**Given our timeline, we are NOT able to extend the submission deadline this year**


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

1. To submit an abstract, you must first create an account by registering on this page: (https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/userlogin/register/login)

2. After registering, Dryfta (portal company) will email you a temporary password, which you will use to sign in to the system for the first time. You will be prompted to change your password.

3. After you are logged in, click on “Abstract Submissions” at the top of the page and follow the template to complete and submit your abstract proposal


2019 AAPA CONVENTION WEBSITE:

https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/