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Call for 2021 AAPA Professional and Student awards applications due July 31, 2021

By Announcements, Awards, Call for Applications

Full descriptions of awards review here

The AAPA Awards and Recognition Committee requests nominations for the following:


Professional Awards
• Okura Community Leadership Award
• Distinguished Contributions Award
• Lifetime Achievement Award
• Early Career Award for Research
• Early Career Award for Service

Student Awards *separate from the Division on Students Awards
• Dissertation Research Grant
• Stephen C. Rose Scholarship for Psychology Research on Asian American Youth


All award winners will be notified prior to the annual AAPA Convention. Presentation of all awards will
take place at the 2021 Annual AAPA Convention Awards Ceremony.
Current members of the Executive Committee are not eligible for these awards during their term of
office. Members of the AAPA Awards and Recognition Committee and of the Executive Committee
may make nominations; however, if they do, they must withdraw from the voting process related to any
nominee for whom they have written a letter of support.
Criteria and Nomination Procedures: Descriptions of each award, nomination criteria, and required
materials are provided on the following pages.
Submissions:
• Materials for each award must be compiled into one PDF document titled with the nominee’s
name and award name. For example, “KaraBautistaDissertation.pdf”.
• Submit only one nomination per email to asaw@depaul.edu. Please put the name of the applicant
and “AAPA Awards” in the subject line of the email.
• Faxes or mailed submissions will not be accepted. (If you don’t have access to email, please
work with a colleague who does).
• Please notify one of the committee chairs if you would like to resubmit a nomination packet
from last year.


*Please note, the Awards and Recognition Committee does not provide feedback on application
materials.


Deadline: Nominations must be received by July 31, 2021 11:59 EST. Late and incomplete
submissions will not be reviewed.

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award

By AAJP, Announcements, Awards No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | 2016 Best Paper Award

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award Winner:
“You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart”: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity
by Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

(from: Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 7 No. 2, pp. 108-119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000038)

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “‘You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart’: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity,” for winning the AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award. The article was published in the June 2016 issue of Asian American Journal of Psychology. The award winners were announced at the 2017 AAPA Convention Awards Banquet by Dr. Bryan Kim, Editor of AAJP. Below is a brief biography of the authors, Drs. Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa Witkow, and their reflections on this research experience. AAPA would like to thank and recognize the award winners and all authors who continue to make outstanding contributions to AAJP.

Brief Biography of Dr. Taylor Thompson

Taylor L. Thompson earned a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University in psychology and English—creative writing. She received a master’s in psychology from Wake Forest University and a doctorate in counseling psychology and school psychology from Florida State University. She currently serves as a licensed psychologist for Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics in Jacksonville, Florida. Her research interests and projects have focused on the experiences of youth from diverse backgrounds, including Asian American adolescents, gifted and talented children, and college students with disabilities.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Melissa Witkow (Not Pictured)

Melissa R. Witkow is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Willamette University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from UCLA and her B.A. in Psychology from Pomona College. In her research, she studies the intersection between peer relationships and academic motivation and achievement during adolescence, and how adolescents from diverse backgrounds negotiate the demands in their lives.

 

Reflections from the Lead Author
This study grew out of a thesis project that began in our lab a decade ago. As I was first learning about the model minority stereotype, one of the things that struck me was the stereotype’s lengthy history. As stated in the paper, stereotypes of Asian Americans as an industrious wonder group grew out of Chinese immigration in the 19th century. The idea that the thoughts of people over 150 years ago could shape how people treat each other now—like some sort of strange cultural heirloom—interested me almost as much as how the stereotype has evolved over time. Asian immigrants and their ancestors have been viewed as everything from threatening invaders to pleasant high-achievers in America based on what was convenient in the sociopolitical context. After learning all of this, my biggest questions became how youth exposed to such a shifting image felt about it and how the image affected their views of themselves and their backgrounds.

To put this idea into action, our initial data collection involved putting some miles on the car traveling to a network of schools in North Carolina, some of which had relatively low densities of Asian American students. Our procedure involved calling down eligible students to a common area in the school (e.g., cafeteria, library). One distinct impression I remember was worrying over the students feeling singled out. Indeed, some appeared nervous or made jokes about being gathered in this way. However, others appeared to feel a sense of pride in being called upon as experts of their own experiences. Our co-author, Lisa, remembers many students feeling pleased that they were being studied and that someone cared about their thoughts and feelings. Either way, the data collection experience really made me take pause and wonder how the salience of this Asian American identity fluctuated for these teenagers minute-to-minute, day-to-day, and in different periods in their lives. Reflecting back now, I wonder what the study results would look like if we started over again today? Given what we know about model minority myths being propped up during times of racial tension, I wonder if the current adolescent generation’s awareness of stereotyping and the salience of their identities has changed materially from our initial group, even just 10 years later? I suppose research on an anthropological artifact like a stereotype will always be a moving target. People constantly change, and so do their opinions and relationships. Luckily for us social science researchers, there will always be ongoing questions to ask!

 


For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

2017 AAPA Inaugural Class of Graduate Student Leadership Institute participants

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AAPA Leadership Program Chairs, Drs. Richelle Concepcion and Nellie Tran are pleased and excited to introduce the Inaugural AAPA Graduate Leadership Institute participants!

The leadership institute is an intentional effort to bring AAPA student members together for a 2-day intensive leadership building and networking experience. The Leadership Institute brings individuals together for an intensive period in order to facilitate networking and bonding that will hopefully allow students to continue to work together and support one another.

Please join us in congratulating this outstanding group of people!

The selection process was highly competitive as we received applications from several exceptional candidates. We strongly encourage folks who’ve sought additional supports and opportunities to engage in work they find meaningful outside of their home graduate programs to consider applying next year. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to Dr. Richelle Concepcion or Dr. Nellie Tran.

AAPA 2017-2018 Leadership Fellows

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The AAPA Leadership Fellows Program is excited to announce the

2017-2018 AAPA Leadership Fellows

Amanda Breen, Ph.D. & Kimberly Koko Nishi, Psy.D.

 

Dr. Amanda Breen is currently an assistant professor of psychology at Neumann University. She earned her doctorate in Social Psychology from Temple University and her Master’s degree in public health from Drexel University where she also worked as research associate for the School of Public Health’s Center for Hunger-Free Communities. She is deeply committed to addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in her teaching and scholarship. Currently, Dr. Breen is actively working on projects with her students investigating how experiencing stereotype threat in the criminal justice domain might have consequences in the academic domain and examining the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and college major. On the Neumann campus, Dr. Breen continues to work on fostering an inclusive environment for students, faculty and staff of color, LGBTQIAA students, low-income and first-generation college students, and any all others from historically marginalized communities.

Dr. Koko Nishi is a licensed psychologist and serves as the Outreach Coordinator for Counseling and Psychological Services at San Diego State University. Dr. Nishi completed her Masters in Psychology and Education at Teachers College Columbia University and her doctorate in in Clinical Psychology from George Washington University and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at University of California, San Diego with an emphasis in suicide prevention and mental health promotion. Her clinical interests include anxiety, depression, trauma, multicultural and diversity issues, intersectionality, identity integration, and Asian/Asian-American mental health. Dr. Nishi is passionate about collaborating with campus partners to create outreach programs that raise awareness and promote resources to help reduce mental health stigma, particularly within underrepresented populations. 

Please join us in welcoming our newest AAPA Leadership Fellows!