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AAPA 2018 Annual Convention: Call for Proposals

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(NEW THIS YEAR: The 2018 AAPA Convention has its own website! Please see details below for link and proposal submission instructions.)

ASIAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

2018 ANNUAL CONVENTION

August 8, 2018

San Francisco, California

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

INTERACTIVE SESSIONS * DIFFICULT DIALOGUES *  SYMPOSIA * POSTERS

 

Submission Deadline: April 15th, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. PST

IMPORTANT – READ:

**Proposals that address the convention theme will be prioritized**

**Given our tight timeline, we are NOT able to extend the submission deadline this year**

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. To submit an abstract, you must first create an account by registering on this page: (https://aapa2018.dryfta.com/en/attendees-authors-registration)
  2. After registering, Dryfta (portal company) will email you a temporary password, which you will use to sign in to the system for the first time. You will be prompted to change your password.
  3. After you are logged in, click on “Abstract Submissions” at the top of the page and follow the template to complete and submit your abstract proposal.

2018 AAPA CONVENTION WEBSITE:

https://aapa2018.dryfta.com/en/

 

THEME:

THROWING ROCKS, BUILDING BRIDGES:

Centering and Uplifting our Intersecting Voices

This year’s theme continues to build on previous convention themes with the goal of encouraging necessary and difficult conversations that can strengthen research, practice, and advocacy efforts in Asian American mental health. Our theme for this year focuses on individual and community empowerment that centers around (re)claiming space, uplifting our voices, and acknowledging all the intersecting identities that make us unique. Intersectionality is defined by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw as “how overlapping or intersecting social identities, particularly minority identities, relate to systems and structures of oppression, domination, or discrimination.” Our hope is that this theme will be a call to action to honor those that inspire us to keep fighting for our values and beliefs while acknowledging the efforts of AAPA’s current and past members.

 

“Throwing rocks, building bridges” is a tribute to the past, present, and future of AAPA. We stand upon the shoulders of our elders – the ones who have provided the rocks necessary for the current generation to throw. As rock throwers and agitators, the current generation pushes the boundaries necessary to successfully propel AAPA into the future, with the recognition that we are in the same fight. Our elders laid the foundation from where we build the bridges to our common goals. By encouraging members to acknowledge our past and present, we aim to move towards breaking down walls and building bridges between AAPI and other groups, our multiple identities, and subgroups within AAPA in celebration for the future of our organization.

 

We are seeking proposals that draw attention to the experiences of those with multiple intersecting identities,  underrepresented Asian American groups (e.g., South Asians, Southeast Asians, Filipinos, religious minorities, LGBTQIA+, international folks), as well as those that bridge past AAPI research or clinical applications with present or future directions. In addition, we are interested in submissions that focus on collaborative projects (both nationally and internationally), interdisciplinary scholarship, multicultural perspective, cross-cultural psychology, and other works that further social justice movements. We encourage submissions from researchers, community leaders and activists, mental health providers, and educators who work with underrepresented communities. Moreover, we welcome submissions from professionals and scholars in allied fields (e.g., Anthropology, Asian American Studies, Communication, Education, History, Law, Nursing, Political Science, Public Health, Psychiatry, Social Work, and Sociology) with whom we collaborate and whose work informs Asian American mental health.

 

Proposals may address, but are not limited to, the following topics within AAPI mental health:

  • Intersections of social identities such as race, gender, and sexual orientation (examining complexities of our different identities, focus on the different experiences)
  • Research/outreach with underrepresented AAPI groups (Southeast Asian, Pacific Islanders, LGBTQ, etc.)
  • Collaborative and interdisciplinary work examining the diversity of the AAPI community
  • Exploration and examination of existing research, conceptual, and/or therapeutic models with AAPI groups and adaptations/supplements to such models (e.g., cultural adaptations to cognitive behavioral therapy models, using both minority stress and intersectionality frameworks in research and/or clinical work)
  • Research, outreach and other topics involving the LGBTQIA+ communities
  • Social reform, public policy, and political action (involvement of AAPIs in current national and international political movements)
  • Social justice and equity
  • Immigration, immigration reform, needs and challenges of immigrant communities (examination of different adaptation experiences, process of acculturation, code switching, etc.)
  • Identity development across different racial/ethnic minority groups (while incorporating intersectionality such as racial and ethnic identity development at different ages/across the lifespan, intersections of race/ethnicity and gender identity development, etc.)
  • Experiences of  intersectional microaggression and other forms discrimination (e.g., gendered racism, sexualized racism, generational differences across experiences of discrimination, international perspectives on discrimination and microaggressions)  
  • Inter/within group conflicts; intergroup coalitions
  • Mental health and health disparities (research, outreach, programs that focus on access to care)
  • Increasing visibility in the education system and clinical and counseling settings
  • Multicultural, and polycultural perspectives
  • Increasing visibility of AAPIs with multiple heritages

 

Who May Submit

Individuals (AAPA members and non-members) at all levels of training (professional, graduate level, and undergraduate level), including non-psychologists interested in mental health issues affecting AAPIs are encouraged to submit proposals. We particularly encourage submissions from those interested in AAPI mental health who have not previously participated in AAPA conventions. Because strengthening the diversity of our colleagues in other organizations is of particular importance for psychologists of color, we strongly encourage submissions from members of other organizations, including but not limited to, the Association of Black Psychologists, Society of Indian Psychologists, and the National Latina/o Psychological Association.

 

While there is no limit to the total number of submitted proposals per person, individuals can only be the first author of one proposal submission. In the event that multiple first author submissions are received from an individual, the committee will review only the first proposal received. Exempted from this rule are presenters who are invited speakers.

 

  • Deadline for all submissions is April 15th, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • All presenters are required to officially register for the convention

 

Types of Submissions

  • Interactive Sessions: In a typical 90-minute session, a facilitator introduces the topic and sets up a context

for subsequent discussions and interactions among participants. For questions about submitting an

interactive session proposal, please contact Sessions Co-Chair Yun Garrison at aapasessionscommittee@gmail.com .

  • Difficult Dialogues: In this 90-minute session, a facilitator engages participants in a meaningful

dialogue about issues that are difficult to discuss in everyday conversations. Proposal submissions must delineate how facilitators will establish and manage a safe space that promotes respectful expression of opposing views, and provides an environment in which differing perspectives are defended, heard, and considered by participants who hold conflicting cultural values and ideas.  For questions about submitting a difficult dialogue session proposal, please contact Sessions Co-Chair Yun Garrison at aapasessionscommittee@gmail.com .

  • Symposia: In a typical 90-minute symposium, three or four presentations are given around a common

theme. An expert discussant may provide feedback. The symposium proposal submission must include

one program summary that integrates the multiple presentations within the session. It must also

clearly indicate the titles and contents of each presentation within the symposium. A chair for the

symposium must be named on the application portal. No individual paper proposals for symposium

presentations are accepted. For questions, please contact Yun Garrison at aapasessionscommittee@gmail.com .

  • Posters: Posters are displayed to disseminate information on various conceptual and/or empirical reports.

During the designated 90-minute poster session, participants are invited to interact with poster presenters. Single research papers should be submitted as posters. For questions, please contact Poster Session Co-Chairs are Iris Miao at irismiao831@gmail.com and Dieu Truong at dmtruong@central.uh.edu.

 

Guidelines for Proposals

  • All online proposals will need to include:
  • Contact information for each presenter
  • Abstract (500 to 700 words) with no author names
  • Program Summary (50 to 100 words) with no author names
  • 3-4 Learning Objectives (not required for poster submissions)
  • Proposals will be sent for anonymous reviews. As such, the Abstract and Program Summary should not include identifying information of the author(s) and/or presenter(s).
  • Submitters will be notified by email upon receipt of their proposal.
  • For submissions that may be eligible to award Continuing Education units (CEs), individual authors will be contacted to provide additional information.
  • Submission outcomes will be sent via email by May 5th, 2018.

 

Proposal Rating Criteria

Proposals will be rated based on the following criteria:

  • Relationship to convention theme
  • Relevance/timeliness of topic
  • Membership appeal
  • Innovation and creativity
  • Scientific/empirical soundness (for research symposia and posters)
  • Adequacy of strategy for involving audience (for interactive sessions and difficult dialogues)
  • Contribution to the field

 

Additional Information

Presenters should bring their own laptops (those with Mac laptops should bring the appropriate adaptor to connect to the LCD projector). LCD projectors for PowerPoint presentations will be provided. Requests for additional AV equipment will be addressed after the final selection of presenters has been decided.

 

Visit the 2018 AAPA Convention website at https://aapa2018.dryfta.com/en/ for more information.. For all other questions regarding the 2018 AAPA Convention, please email one of this year’s co-chairs, Nic Rider at nicole.rider@gmail.com or Justine Fan at justine.angela17@gmail.com.

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | 2016 Best Paper Award

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award Winner:
“You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart”: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity
by Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

(from: Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 7 No. 2, pp. 108-119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000038)

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “‘You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart’: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity,” for winning the AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award. The article was published in the June 2016 issue of Asian American Journal of Psychology. The award winners were announced at the 2017 AAPA Convention Awards Banquet by Dr. Bryan Kim, Editor of AAJP. Below is a brief biography of the authors, Drs. Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa Witkow, and their reflections on this research experience. AAPA would like to thank and recognize the award winners and all authors who continue to make outstanding contributions to AAJP.

Brief Biography of Dr. Taylor Thompson

Taylor L. Thompson earned a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University in psychology and English—creative writing. She received a master’s in psychology from Wake Forest University and a doctorate in counseling psychology and school psychology from Florida State University. She currently serves as a licensed psychologist for Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics in Jacksonville, Florida. Her research interests and projects have focused on the experiences of youth from diverse backgrounds, including Asian American adolescents, gifted and talented children, and college students with disabilities.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Melissa Witkow (Not Pictured)

Melissa R. Witkow is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Willamette University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from UCLA and her B.A. in Psychology from Pomona College. In her research, she studies the intersection between peer relationships and academic motivation and achievement during adolescence, and how adolescents from diverse backgrounds negotiate the demands in their lives.

 

Reflections from the Lead Author
This study grew out of a thesis project that began in our lab a decade ago. As I was first learning about the model minority stereotype, one of the things that struck me was the stereotype’s lengthy history. As stated in the paper, stereotypes of Asian Americans as an industrious wonder group grew out of Chinese immigration in the 19th century. The idea that the thoughts of people over 150 years ago could shape how people treat each other now—like some sort of strange cultural heirloom—interested me almost as much as how the stereotype has evolved over time. Asian immigrants and their ancestors have been viewed as everything from threatening invaders to pleasant high-achievers in America based on what was convenient in the sociopolitical context. After learning all of this, my biggest questions became how youth exposed to such a shifting image felt about it and how the image affected their views of themselves and their backgrounds.

To put this idea into action, our initial data collection involved putting some miles on the car traveling to a network of schools in North Carolina, some of which had relatively low densities of Asian American students. Our procedure involved calling down eligible students to a common area in the school (e.g., cafeteria, library). One distinct impression I remember was worrying over the students feeling singled out. Indeed, some appeared nervous or made jokes about being gathered in this way. However, others appeared to feel a sense of pride in being called upon as experts of their own experiences. Our co-author, Lisa, remembers many students feeling pleased that they were being studied and that someone cared about their thoughts and feelings. Either way, the data collection experience really made me take pause and wonder how the salience of this Asian American identity fluctuated for these teenagers minute-to-minute, day-to-day, and in different periods in their lives. Reflecting back now, I wonder what the study results would look like if we started over again today? Given what we know about model minority myths being propped up during times of racial tension, I wonder if the current adolescent generation’s awareness of stereotyping and the salience of their identities has changed materially from our initial group, even just 10 years later? I suppose research on an anthropological artifact like a stereotype will always be a moving target. People constantly change, and so do their opinions and relationships. Luckily for us social science researchers, there will always be ongoing questions to ask!

 


For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

2017 AAPA Inaugural Class of Graduate Student Leadership Institute participants

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AAPA Leadership Program Chairs, Drs. Richelle Concepcion and Nellie Tran are pleased and excited to introduce the Inaugural AAPA Graduate Leadership Institute participants!

The leadership institute is an intentional effort to bring AAPA student members together for a 2-day intensive leadership building and networking experience. The Leadership Institute brings individuals together for an intensive period in order to facilitate networking and bonding that will hopefully allow students to continue to work together and support one another.

Please join us in congratulating this outstanding group of people!

The selection process was highly competitive as we received applications from several exceptional candidates. We strongly encourage folks who’ve sought additional supports and opportunities to engage in work they find meaningful outside of their home graduate programs to consider applying next year. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to Dr. Richelle Concepcion or Dr. Nellie Tran.

AAPA Press Release: DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

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DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 6, 2017

Contact: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.,

President, Asian American Psychological Association

kevin.nadal@aapaonline.org | aapaonline.org

NEW YORK: The Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA) strongly condemns the repeal of Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals. With this recent decision, 800,000 DREAMers, who arrived to the U.S. as children, will no longer be protected under federal law and may be deported after 6 months. It is estimated that 16,000 young Asian Americans are currently DACA recipients, and that only about a quarter of eligible Korean (24%), Filipino (26%), and Asian Indians (28%) even applied for the program in the first two years. Thus, there are thousands of other undocumented Asian Americans who could have benefitted from this program.

AAPA recognizes that Asian Americans have experienced many discriminatory immigration laws throughout history- including the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (which was the first ban of immigrants from any country and had permanently prevented all Chinese people from entering the US); the Asian Exclusion Act of 1924 (which limited the number of immigrants to 2% of the total number of people from that country already in the US); the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 (which set a quota of 50 Filipinos per year); and the Luce–Celler Act of 1946 (which set an annual quota of 100 for Asian Indians and Filipinos). Due to anti-Asian sentiment, the Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935 provided government funding for transportation to Filipino who promised to never return to the US. However, the majority stayed because they wanted the chance to fulfill their American dreams, and the Supreme Court found the legislation to be unconstitutional.

 

While the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 put an end to immigration quotas, we must remember the history of immigration for Asian Americans – in order to contextualize, and empathize with, DACA recipients and other DREAMers today. Like these earlier immigrants from Asia and other countries who came without documentation, DREAMers merely want the opportunity to thrive in the land of opportunity. DACA recipients are teachers, attorneys, community organizers, health care workers, students, and more. They came to this country as children; they are just as American as those who are born in the US. While there is no logical reason to repeal this program, there are dozens of reasons of why it would be bad for our country – economic loss, dismantled families, mental health consequences for all involved, and more. These Americans should not be criminalized. They did nothing wrong. They cannot be “sent home”; the US is their home.

 

AAPA calls on our U.S. Congress to stop the repeal of DACA, as it threatens the mental health of undocumented families and of all immigrants in general. In his recent essay, Dr. E.J. David, an Associate Professor at the University of Alaska describes the detrimental impact of discrimination on the mental health of immigrants.  He urges: “The U.S. Congress has the power to relieve at least 800,000 people and their families the burden of carrying unnecessary stress. Our elected representatives have the power to stop the stress and its many negative consequences. They have the power to stop the oppression.”

 

Finally to all DREAMers and other undocumented Americans, AAPA pledges to support you; stand with you; and fight with you. As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. so eloquently stated, “No one is free until we are all free.”

 

The mission of the Asian American Psychological Association is to advance the mental health and well-being of Asian American communities through research, professional practice, education, and policy.

(http://aapaonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/AAPA-Statement_DACA-Repeal.pdf)

AAJP Vol. 8, No. 3, featuring “Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities” by Milner and Kim

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | September 2017 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities
by Uma Chandrika Millner and Min Kim

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Perspectives on Work and Work-related Challenges among Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disabilities,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the September 2017 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the September 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner

Dr. Uma Chandrika Millner works as a Research Scientist at Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and recently joined Lesley University as Assistant Professor. Social justice and multiculturalism form the foundations of her work. Her research interests focus on the community engagement of diverse groups of individuals with psychiatric disabilities with a specific focus on work and employment and Asian mental health.

 

Reflections from the Lead Author

While exploring ideas for his postdoctoral project, Dr. Min Kim first proposed a replication of my Meaning of Work (MoW) study with Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities. In response, I recall insisting “Let’s make this as simple and uncomplicated as possible.” The MoW study had a complex design combining consensual qualitative research procedures (CQR) with a participatory component. Anyone who has trained and supervised peers in conducting CQR procedures will know how I felt. With large gaps in the psychosocial rehabilitation literature on Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities, it can be rather tempting to conduct a behemoth of a project. As a researcher from a minority background, it is really hard to resist this temptation. So instead, I insisted on an unambitious study design with a quick turnaround time. We finally agreed on a study that would build on the MoW project and compare the work perspectives of Asian American and White Americans with psychiatric disabilities. However, “simple” turned out to be far more complicated. We could not find a reliable and valid instrument to meet our needs. On top of that, we could not shake the compelling desire to represent the lived experiences of Asian Americans with psychiatric disabilities without which the study just did not seem complete. Hence, the final version of our project evolved to being a mixed methods study that included instrument development, group comparison, and qualitative inquiry procedures. I suppose some lessons in life are not easily learned. To quote Master Oogway (Kungfu Panda), “One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it.” The art of simplicity is definitely a work in progress for me . Nonetheless, we are very pleased to be able to share our work and bring this project to the next level. Dr. Kim is already developing the instrument further and we are working on plans to address the community integration needs of Asian American individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

 

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 3 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Perspectives on Work and Work-Related Challenges Among Asian Americans With Psychiatric Disabilities [Free download of article]
Uma Chandrika Millner, and Min Kim

Does Emotion Regulation Moderate the Discrimination-Adjustment Link for Adopted Korean American Adolescents? Yekun Qin, Adam Y. Kim, Jenny C. Su, Alison W. Hu, and Richard M. Lee

Latent Profiles of Acculturation and Their Implications for Health: A Study With Asian Americans in Central Texas.
Yuri Jang, Nan Sook Park, David A. Chiriboga, and Miyong T. Kim

Traumatic Experiences and Associated Symptomatology in Asian American Middle School Students.
Elizabeth Davies-Mercier, Michelle W. Woodbridge, W. Carl Sumi, S. Patrick Thornton, Katrina D. Roundfield, Terrence Lee-St. John, Kristen M.Rouspil, and Jennifer Yu

Help-Seeking and Coping Behaviors Among Asian Americans: The Roles of Asian Values, Emotional Intelligence, and Optimism.
Nina Lei, and John Pellitteri

Searching for Connection—Finding Resolution: A Grounded Theory Analysis of Writings of Korean American Adopted Adults.
Oh Myo Kim, Kevin C.Hynes, and Richard M. Lee

The Response to Rural-to-Urban Migration and Other Life Stressors in Shanghai: Effects on Physical and Psychological Well-Being Among Parents of Young Children
Wen-Jui Han, Judith Siegel, and Liwei Zhang

 


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/09/19/aajp-vol-8-no-3-…y-milner-and-kim/
For more information on AAJPhttp://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychologybryankim@hawaii.edu