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AAJP Vol. 7, No. 4 featuring “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015” by Kiang et al.

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | December 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Lisa Kiang

Dr. Lisa Kiang

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015
by Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Lisa Kiang, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the December 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

Reflections from the Lead Author
I have sort of a love-hate relationship with technology, and my emotions certainly fluctuated to the extremes while collaborating on this paper. To start, though, I am deeply grateful to have had the opportunity to take on the important and enormous challenge of reviewing the outstanding research on Asian Americans published in 2015. It was rewarding and inspiring to see the quality of cutting-edge research focusing on this distinctive population. And in terms of sheer quantity, coordinating the coding, summary, review, and synthesis of hundreds upon hundreds of articles is no small feat and would never have been possible without the help from my small, but mighty, research lab and from my co-authors from the SRCD Asian Caucus. Indeed, one of the biggest tasks in working on this project was figuring out how to manage the process of coding articles for inclusion in the review. After consulting with one of my university’s reference librarians early on, I decided that using a combination of EbscoHost folders and Zotero would be one of the best ways to filter through abstracts and identify the final set of articles that met the criteria for inclusion—and this is where the “hate” comes in. These software programs and I had some words during the coding process, some pretty nasty words. And there were tears, mostly on my part. Some fists were even raised. Yet, in the end, glitches were resolved, inconsistencies were addressed, and no severe damage was done. After completing this project, Zotero and I decided we would take a little bit of break from each other, spend some time apart, but I think we’ll still be friends. The “love” aspect of my relationship with technology can be illustrated by the fact that much of the preparation and writing of this paper was handled internationally. I had the great fortune to teach in Vienna, Austria during the Spring of 2016 (more detailed teaching escapades can be found at http://www.s-r-a.org/announcements/blog/2016-05-17-teaching-semester-vienna-connecting-cultural-experiences-class-concept). Through technology, I was able to very efficiently and effectively communicate with my coding team and co-authors, whether it be via e-mails, electronic servers, shared folders, or online communication platforms. These days, it no longer seems remarkable to hold a meeting when attendees are distributed across multiple states and two or more continents, but it is the beauty and power of technology that makes such collaboration feasible and fun.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015 [Free download of article]
Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

Asian American Men’s Internalization of Western Media Appearance Ideals, Social Comparison, and Acculturative Stress
Brian TaeHyuk Keum

Parent-Child Closeness and Acculturation in Predicting Racial Preference in Mate Selection among Asian Americans 
Quyen T. Sklar, Jenny H. Pak, and Stacy Eltiti

Big 5 Personality and Subjective Well-Being in Asian Americans: Testing Optimism and Pessimism as Mediators
P. Priscilla Lui, David Rollock, Edward C. Chang, Frederick F. T. Leong, and Byron L. Zamboanga

Does Endorsement of the Model Minority Myth Relate to Anti-Asian Sentiments among White College Students? The Role of a Color-blind Racial Attitude
Sarah J. Parks and Hyung Chol Yoo

Associations among Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Trust in Provider, and Treatment Adherence among Predominantly Low-Income Asian American Patients
Shuchang Kang, Carolyn M. Tucker, Guillermo M. Wippold, Michael Marsiske, and Paige H. Wegener


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2016/11/04/aajp-vol-7-no-4/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAPA Receives the APA Public Interest Leadership Conference (PILC) Health Equity Dissemination Award

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AAPA Receives the APA Public Interest Leadership Conference (PILC) Health Equity Dissemination Award

  

AAPA members Dr. Sumie Okazaki, Ulash Thakore-Dunlap LMFT, Dr. Cixin Shea, and Dr. Munyi Wang received the APA PILC award to work on creating and disseminating a resource based on guidelines on bullying and victimization among Asian American and Pacfic Islanders (AAPI) K-12 students to school professionals and parents.

AAPA aims to address the lack of knowledge and resources on AAPI students experiencing bullying in the community by creating a practical resource for teachers and parents on AAPI bullying and to disseminate the materials online in ways that are accessible by school administrators, academic counselors, school-based mental health professionals, teachers, and to parents.

AAPA will plan to print a sample batch of the guidelines in 4 languages (Chinese, English, Korean, and Vietnamese) to distribute through conferences and workshops. We plan to also disseminate the guidelines electronically by sharing the products and materials with the APA Safe and Supportive Schools Program as well as other social media tools and websites, making it accessible to all. 

In 2017, AAPA looks forward to sharing the final resource pack with you.

(updated) Open Letter & Call to Action from AAPA EC

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AAPA OPEN LETTER & CALL TO ACTION

Initial Release Date for Membership Commentary: July 14, 2016

Final Release Date to the Public: October 4, 2016

 

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

The  deaths of Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, Terrence Crutcher, Keith Lamont Scott, and Alfred Olango, and Dallas Police Officers, Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael J. Smith, Brent Thompson, and Patrick Zamarripa, have amplified the violence and turmoil in the U.S. at this time. As leaders in the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), we ourselves are grieving and experiencing the range of emotions – intense sadness and loss, fear and helplessness, anger and frustration. We are at a critical crossroads as a community. We must raise our collective voice and resist the temptation to remain silent. We must stand and act in solidarity with our Black brothers and sisters, including our own family members who identify as Black and Asian. We reaffirm our commitment to #BlackLivesMatter, as echoed in our January 2015 statement on the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. Importantly, we seek to move beyond statements and call for action as #API4BlackLives.

We must now come together professionally to stand with our African American and Black brothers and sisters.

As professionals and students in the field of Psychology and Mental Health, we are in a unique position to contribute to the efforts of combating anti-Blackness and responding to the deadly consequences of racism in this country. Many of us have access to opportunities to impact change at multiple levels. We ask that you reflect individually and collectively with your own networks to assess what skills, experience, and wisdom you hold that may serve to actively resist the system of racial oppression that continues to devalue Black and Brown lives. We honor that these actions, however small, involve taking risks and shoring up the courage to enact change. It is within AAPA’s mission and our ethical duty to help individuals and communities heal from these ongoing and historical traumas, as well as to work towards education and prevention of these toxic societal environments.

The AAPA Executive Committee has compiled a list of actions and resources that we, as Asian American/ Pacific Islander psychologists, allied professionals, and students can engage in. This list is organized by various contexts in which you may intervene – as individuals, within our families, in academic & educational settings, in clinical & therapy settings, and through other systems.

Individual Levels

  • Take action: Small actions add up and contribute to resisting despair. Share information, attend rallies or vigils, speak up, and be in community with other folks.
  • Check in with your Black loved ones and offer support however they may need.
  • Understand your own biases by taking an implicit bias test. Dialogue about your results with someone you care about and can encourage you to challenge these biases: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html
  • #StayWoke (www.staywoke.org) surveys your strengths and interests to connect you with activism opportunities (approx. 5 minutes).
  • Continue educating yourself on the issues. Some resources include:
  • Own your privilege by participating in the #IOwnMyPrivilege social media campaign

 

Family

  • Talk to your family members of all generations about why #BlackLivesMatter. This is one open-source example created by several AAPI leaders (other languages also available) to help start this conversation with family: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jJwrgAk923hTSHVNkqPo610FMBNrecWz04NCK55VMJ4/preview
  • Translate information. Be reminded that much of our AAPI community would benefit from discussions and information communicated in their respective ethnic language. Consider the use of language, metaphors, and personal experience to share a challenging perspective.
  • Consider historical race-based trauma within your family. Be mindful that our immigrant and refugee community may be triggered by the constant violence and brutality in the media.
  • Stress the interconnectedness of AAPI and Black experiences with racism. Check in with folks and help them to understand that a system that does not respect Black lives will not respect Asian and Pacific Islander lives.
  • Engage in a conversation with children about racial injustice, and provide a safe space for them to ask questions and talk about their feelings. One helpful website is called Raising Race-Conscious Children (http://www.raceconscious.org/). You can also find other articles here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1I1BUMrKPUaERiph_3Arq8_MqQ2SDqdpF7mxQXt3_DTs/mobilebasic?pli=1#h.2m3b6zf7wxph

 

Academic & Educational Settings

Clinical & Therapy Settings

  • Invite your clients to discuss recent issues. If you are feeling fearful or uncertain, seek consultation or supervision. Here are two articles to consider
  • Be mindful of ways that you may commit racial microaggressions in therapy settings: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/culturally-speaking/201308/how-well-meaning-therapists-commit-racism
  • Foster dialogue with other clinical staff. If you work in a clinical setting with other clinicians (e.g., hospitals, university counseling centers, community mental health clinics), assess how well you are providing support for Black/African American communities as an institution, especially with regard to ongoing police brutality trauma.
  • Broach subjects of police brutality and related anti-Blackness in supervision. If you provide clinical supervision for other clinicians/trainees, clarify that these topics are relevant and appropriate topics for the therapy space and for supervision. Model and engage in active dialogue with your supervisees, showing how to broach and explore their own affective experiences while discussing race, White supremacy, and anti-Blackness. Support them in being able to foster these conversations with their clients.  

Psychology/Mental Health Partnerships with other Systems

 

  • Work with police departments as psychology experts:

 

      • Inquire if your local police department has required trainings or continuing education opportunities regarding racism or social justice. If anything, find out if they have trainings on mental health issues; if you provide trainings about mental health issues, you can integrate issues related to racism and social justice in your work.
      • Inquire if your police departments have a Community Affairs Bureau or Community Advisory Board. If they do, join it. If they don’t, find out how to create one.
    • Go beyond working to educate White folks.
    • Consider serving as a commissioner if your hometown has a Human Relations Commission. You can also offer to speak at a commission meeting on public record about the importance of police-community dialogues and supporting safety for POC.
    • Request that your Mayor or City Council address concerns about safety and trauma in your community.

 

  • Find other ways that fit your professional skills to center Blackness and work to support the Black community.

We hope that these resources serve as a starting point for further exchange of support and collaboration among our members to promote #API4BlackLives.

 

In Solidarity,

AAPA Executive Committee

 

www.aapaonline.org

Twitter: @AAPAOnline

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aapaonline

Email: contact@aapaonline.org

 

2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Dr. Jan Estrellado & Dr. Susan Han

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It is with great pride and excitement that we announce the 2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Jan Estrellado, Ph.D. & Susan Han, Ph.D.

Please join in congratulating and welcoming them!

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Estrellado earned her PhD in clinical psychology with a research focus on trauma and multicultural issues. She specifically studies the experiences of ethnic minority trauma survivors in therapy. Her clinical practice includes working with people suffering from anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. She is currently a lecturer at San Diego State University and a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Stress and Anxiety Management in San Diego, California. She has experience working with teens, adults, and older adults at community mental health treatment centers, psychiatric hospitals, and private practice settings. Before entering the psychology field, she worked as the Assistant Director at the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center and as the Assistant Resident Dean at the University of California, San Diego.

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Han is a licensed psychologist who is currently working at the Counseling Center at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as the Assistant Director of Mental Health Promotion, Outreach and Evaluation. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from George Mason University, completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of Michigan and a post-doctoral residency year at Cornell University Counseling & Psychological Services. Dr. Han is integrative in her approach to therapy, drawing upon humanistic and cognitive-behavioral theories. Her special interests include multicultural identity development and promotion of psychological health and wellness.

Best,
Richelle Conception & Nellie Tran
AAPA Leadership Fellow Co-Chairs

Open Letter & Call to Action from AAPA EC

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AAPA OPEN LETTER & CALL TO ACTION

Initial Release Date: July 14, 2016
Link to Google Document (comments enabled through 8/8/16): https://goo.gl/AqeF1v

Dear Colleagues and Friends:

The recent deaths of Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, and Dallas Police Officers, Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael J. Smith, Brent Thompson, and Patrick Zamarripa, have amplified the violence and turmoil in the U.S. at this time. As leaders in the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), we ourselves are grieving and experiencing the range of emotions – intense sadness and loss, fear and helplessness, anger and frustration. We are at a critical crossroads as a community. We must raise our collective voice and resist the temptation to remain silent. We must stand and act in solidarity with our Black brothers and sisters, including our own Black Asian family. We reaffirm our commitment to #BlackLivesMatter, as echoed in our January 2015 statement on the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. Importantly, we seek to move beyond statements and call for action as #API4BlackLives.

We must now come together professionally to stand with our African American and Black brothers and sisters.

As professionals and students in the field of Psychology and Mental Health, we are in a unique position to contribute to the efforts of combating anti-Blackness and responding to the deadly consequences of racism in this country. Many of us have access to opportunities to impact change at multiple levels. We ask that you reflect individually and collectively with your own networks to assess what skills, experience, and wisdom you hold that may serve to actively resist the system of racial oppression that continues to devalue Black and Brown lives. We honor that these actions, however small, involve taking risks and shoring up the courage to enact change. It is within AAPA’s mission and our ethical duty to help individuals and communities heal from these ongoing and historical traumas, as well as to work towards education and prevention of these toxic societal environments.

The AAPA Executive Committee has compiled a list of actions and resources that we, as Asian American/ Pacific Islander psychologists, allied professionals, and students can engage in. This list is organized by various contexts in which you may intervene – as individuals, within our families, in academic & educational settings, in clinical & therapy settings, and through other systems.

Individual Levels

  • Take action: Small actions add up and contribute to resisting despair. Share information, attend rallies or vigils, speak up, and be in community with other folks.

  • Check in with your Black loved ones and offer support however they may need.

  • Understand your own biases by taking an implicit bias test. Dialogue about your results with someone you care about and can encourage you to challenge these biases: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

  • #StayWoke (www.staywoke.org) surveys your strengths and interests to connect you with activism opportunities (approx. 5 minutes).

  • Continue educating yourself on the issues. Some resources include:

  • Own your privilege by participating in the #IOwnMyPrivilege social media campaign

 

Family

  • Talk to your family members of all generations about why #BlackLivesMatter. This is one open-source example created by several AAPI leaders (other languages also available) to help start this conversation with family: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jJwrgAk923hTSHVNkqPo610FMBNrecWz04NCK55VMJ4/preview

  • Translate information. Be reminded that much of our AAPI community would benefit from discussions and information communicated in their respective ethnic language. Consider the use of language, metaphors, and personal experience to share a challenging perspective.

  • Consider historical race-based trauma within your family. Be mindful that our immigrant and refugee community may be triggered by the constant violence and brutality in the media.

  • Stress the interconnectedness of AAPI and Black experiences with racism. Check in with folks and help them to understand that a system that does not respect Black lives will not respect Asian and Pacific Islander lives.

  • Engage in a conversation with children about racial injustice, and provide a safe space for them to ask questions and talk about their feelings. One helpful website is called Raising Race-Conscious Children (http://www.raceconscious.org/). You can also find other articles here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1I1BUMrKPUaERiph_3Arq8_MqQ2SDqdpF7mxQXt3_DTs/mobilebasic?pli=1#h.2m3b6zf7wxph

 

Academic & Educational Settings

Clinical & Therapy Settings

  • Invite your clients to discuss recent issues. If you are feeling fearful or uncertain, seek consultation or supervision. Here are two articles to consider

  • Be mindful of ways that you may commit racial microaggressions in therapy settings: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/culturally-speaking/201308/how-well-meaning-therapists-commit-racism

  • Foster dialogue with other clinical staff. If you work in a clinical setting with other clinicians (e.g., hospitals, university counseling centers, community mental health clinics), assess how well you are providing support for Black/African American communities as an institution, especially with regard to ongoing police brutality trauma.

  • Broach subjects of police brutality and related anti-Blackness in supervision. If you provide clinical supervision for other clinicians/trainees, clarify that these topics are relevant and appropriate topics for the therapy space and for supervision. Model and engage in active dialogue with your supervisees, showing how to broach and explore their own affective experiences while discussing race, White supremacy, and anti-Blackness. Support them in being able to foster these conversations with their clients.

 

Psychology/Mental Health Partnerships with other Systems

  • Work with police departments as psychology experts:

    • Inquire if your local police department has required trainings or continuing education opportunities regarding racism or social justice. If anything, find out if they have trainings on mental health issues; if you provide trainings about mental health issues, you can integrate issues related to racism and social justice in your work.

    • Inquire if your police departments have a Community Affairs Bureau or Community Advisory Board. If they do, join it. If they don’t, find out how to create one.

  • Go beyond working to educate White folks.

  • Consider serving as a commissioner if your hometown has a Human Relations Commission. You can also offer to speak at a commission meeting on public record about the importance of police-community dialogues and supporting safety for POC.

  • Request that your Mayor or City Council address concerns about safety and trauma in your community.

  • Find other ways that fit your professional skills to center Blackness and work to support the Black community.

 

We hope that these resources serve as a starting point for further exchange of support and collaboration among our members to promote #API4BlackLives. Through Monday, August 8th, this document will be open for comments, where members can add their ideas for action and resources to this compilation. The list will then be shared again to the general listserv. We also encourage members to consider the suggestions made by colleagues within APA’s Division 17, as well as the empowering words of AAPA Past-President Dr. Derald Wing Sue and his “Open Letter to Brothers and Sisters of Color.” Finally, we invite all members to engage in these topics and support one another at our Annual Convention this coming Wednesday, August 3rd, whose theme, “Beyond ‘Yellow’ Borders: Revealing Our Diverse Community, Expanding Our Coalition Horizon” is timely.

In Solidarity,

AAPA Executive Committee
www.aapaonline.org | contact@aapaonline.org
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aapaonline<
Twitter: @AAPAOnline

[Download pdf of Open Letter & Call to Action-July 2016]