Category

Member Spotlight

AAJP Vol. 7, No. 4 featuring “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015” by Kiang et al.

By | AAJP, Announcements, Member Spotlight, News | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | December 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Lisa Kiang

Dr. Lisa Kiang

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015
by Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Lisa Kiang, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the December 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

Reflections from the Lead Author
I have sort of a love-hate relationship with technology, and my emotions certainly fluctuated to the extremes while collaborating on this paper. To start, though, I am deeply grateful to have had the opportunity to take on the important and enormous challenge of reviewing the outstanding research on Asian Americans published in 2015. It was rewarding and inspiring to see the quality of cutting-edge research focusing on this distinctive population. And in terms of sheer quantity, coordinating the coding, summary, review, and synthesis of hundreds upon hundreds of articles is no small feat and would never have been possible without the help from my small, but mighty, research lab and from my co-authors from the SRCD Asian Caucus. Indeed, one of the biggest tasks in working on this project was figuring out how to manage the process of coding articles for inclusion in the review. After consulting with one of my university’s reference librarians early on, I decided that using a combination of EbscoHost folders and Zotero would be one of the best ways to filter through abstracts and identify the final set of articles that met the criteria for inclusion—and this is where the “hate” comes in. These software programs and I had some words during the coding process, some pretty nasty words. And there were tears, mostly on my part. Some fists were even raised. Yet, in the end, glitches were resolved, inconsistencies were addressed, and no severe damage was done. After completing this project, Zotero and I decided we would take a little bit of break from each other, spend some time apart, but I think we’ll still be friends. The “love” aspect of my relationship with technology can be illustrated by the fact that much of the preparation and writing of this paper was handled internationally. I had the great fortune to teach in Vienna, Austria during the Spring of 2016 (more detailed teaching escapades can be found at http://www.s-r-a.org/announcements/blog/2016-05-17-teaching-semester-vienna-connecting-cultural-experiences-class-concept). Through technology, I was able to very efficiently and effectively communicate with my coding team and co-authors, whether it be via e-mails, electronic servers, shared folders, or online communication platforms. These days, it no longer seems remarkable to hold a meeting when attendees are distributed across multiple states and two or more continents, but it is the beauty and power of technology that makes such collaboration feasible and fun.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015 [Free download of article]
Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

Asian American Men’s Internalization of Western Media Appearance Ideals, Social Comparison, and Acculturative Stress
Brian TaeHyuk Keum

Parent-Child Closeness and Acculturation in Predicting Racial Preference in Mate Selection among Asian Americans 
Quyen T. Sklar, Jenny H. Pak, and Stacy Eltiti

Big 5 Personality and Subjective Well-Being in Asian Americans: Testing Optimism and Pessimism as Mediators
P. Priscilla Lui, David Rollock, Edward C. Chang, Frederick F. T. Leong, and Byron L. Zamboanga

Does Endorsement of the Model Minority Myth Relate to Anti-Asian Sentiments among White College Students? The Role of a Color-blind Racial Attitude
Sarah J. Parks and Hyung Chol Yoo

Associations among Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Trust in Provider, and Treatment Adherence among Predominantly Low-Income Asian American Patients
Shuchang Kang, Carolyn M. Tucker, Guillermo M. Wippold, Michael Marsiske, and Paige H. Wegener


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2016/11/04/aajp-vol-7-no-4/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Dr. Jan Estrellado & Dr. Susan Han

By | Announcements, Member Spotlight, News | No Comments

It is with great pride and excitement that we announce the 2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Jan Estrellado, Ph.D. & Susan Han, Ph.D.

Please join in congratulating and welcoming them!

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Estrellado earned her PhD in clinical psychology with a research focus on trauma and multicultural issues. She specifically studies the experiences of ethnic minority trauma survivors in therapy. Her clinical practice includes working with people suffering from anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. She is currently a lecturer at San Diego State University and a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Stress and Anxiety Management in San Diego, California. She has experience working with teens, adults, and older adults at community mental health treatment centers, psychiatric hospitals, and private practice settings. Before entering the psychology field, she worked as the Assistant Director at the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center and as the Assistant Resident Dean at the University of California, San Diego.

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Han is a licensed psychologist who is currently working at the Counseling Center at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as the Assistant Director of Mental Health Promotion, Outreach and Evaluation. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from George Mason University, completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of Michigan and a post-doctoral residency year at Cornell University Counseling & Psychological Services. Dr. Han is integrative in her approach to therapy, drawing upon humanistic and cognitive-behavioral theories. Her special interests include multicultural identity development and promotion of psychological health and wellness.

Best,
Richelle Conception & Nellie Tran
AAPA Leadership Fellow Co-Chairs

AAJP Vol. 7, No. 2, featuring “Parents and teachers’ perspectives on school bullying among elementary school-aged Asian and Latino immigrant children,” by Shea et al.

By | AAJP, Announcements, Member Spotlight, News | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children
by Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Munyi Shea, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea is an associate professor in psychology at Cal State University, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on issues related to Asian and Latino immigrant mental health, cultural adjustment and school experience, as well as the development and evaluation of culturally responsive school- or community-based prevention and intervention programs. Munyi Shea received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University, and completed an APA-accredited internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center/Harvard Medical School in adult clinical psychology.

Reflections from the Lead Author
The most rewarding aspect of this project was to have parents come up to me after the focus group meetings and say how much they appreciated having a space to tell their children’s stories. I was both delighted and surprised, because, from my perspective, the most challenging part of these interviews was to get the parents talk! Most of them had never been in a research study, and felt uneasy to be in the spotlight. Some of them would conceal their nervousness through giggling, and others would avoid revealing their feelings by focusing solely on factual details. Very few of them actually referred to the children involved in bullying (whether their own or those of others) by their names.

At the time of data collection, I focused on getting all the questions asked, and felt perplexed by the accumulating “unanswered” questions that arose in the discussions. But as years have passed, what I now remember are little details – the parents’ non-verbal and facial expressions, their understated ways of showing support to each other (e.g., a pat on the shoulder, offering the Kleenex tissue paper), and their sense of camaraderie.

A fun fact: Because of the school location and the amount of time we spent on site, my research team and I ate out a lot. We sampled a wide variety of cuisines, ranging from lip-smacking street food and dim sum, to banquet-style Chinese food, earning us the reputation of the “eating” lab.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children [Free download of article]
Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

Measurement Invariance Testing of a Three-Factor Model of Parental Warmth, Psychological
Control, and Knowledge Across European and Asian/Pacific Islander American Youth

Jeremy W. Luk, Kevin M. King, Carolyn A. McCarty, Ann Vander Stoep, and Elizabeth McCauley

“You’re Asian; You’re Supposed to Be Smart”: Adolescents’ Experiences With the Model Minority
Stereotype and Longitudinal Links With Identity

Taylor L. Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

Ethnic Differences in Suicidal Ideation and Its Correlates Among South Asian American
Emerging Adults

Robert Lane, Soumia Cheref, and Regina Miranda

Do Social Constraints Always Hurt? Acculturation Moderates the Relationships Between Social
Constraints and Physical Symptoms of Chinese American Breast Cancer Survivors

Celia Ching Yee Wong and Qian Lu

The Effects of Racism-Related Stress on Asian Americans: Anxiety and Depression Among Different
Generational Statuses

Charles M. Liu and Karen L. Suyemoto


Read about the last issue of AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/2016/03/14/aajp-vol7no1/.
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP Vol 6, No 4 featuring Su Yeong Kim et al.’s Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2014

By | AAJP, Member Spotlight, Research | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | December 2015 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

“Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2014”
Su Yeong Kim, Yishan Shen, Yang Hou, Kelsey Tilton, Linda Juang, and Yijie Wang

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2014,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the December 2015 issue. Below is a brief biography the lead author, Dr. Su Yeong Kim, and a brief insight into the inner workings of crafting such an article. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this article (as well as the other articles) informative and helpful in their professional work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the December 2015 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Su Yeong Kim

Dr. Su Yeong Kim

Dr. Su Yeong Kim

Su Yeong Kim, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. She studies the intersection of family and cultural contexts in understanding the development of children of immigrant in the United States, with a focus on children of Chinese and Mexican origin. Her research has revealed that the commonly held perception of Asian American parents as “tiger parents” is inaccurate. In fact, her eight year longitudinal study of Chinese American families demonstrate supportive parenting as the most common type of parenting leading to the most optimal outcomes in terms of both academic and socio-emotional adjustment in Chinese American adolescents. Her studies on language brokering among Mexican American adolescents reveals that children experience both a sense of burden and efficacy in translating for their non-English fluent parents, and that their perceptions of the language brokering experience relate directly to their socio-emotional adjustment.

Reflections from the Lead Author, Dr. Su Yeong Kim

The writing of the Annual Review of Asian American Psychology for 2014 was an enormous undertaking, involving the coding of an initial set of 4,366 articles to arrive at 316 articles that met criteria for inclusion in the review. The coding and writing of the Annual Review of Asian American Psychology for 2014 involved not only six co-authors, but also more than 15 undergraduate research assistants to accomplish the feat. We were impressed with both the diversity and breadth of research on Asian Americans. Our review highlights the prominence of health related topics in Asian American psychology, and research on older adults becoming more prominent within the field of Asian American psychology. We also highlight the need for more longitudinal, developmental research in the field that samples more diverse ethnic groups among Asian Americans. Our review is the first to highlight some of the most prolific authors in the field of Asian American psychology, ranging from more recent Ph.D.’s such as Stephen H. Chen of Wellesley College to more established senior scholars like Shinobu Kitayama of University of Michigan. It is also the first to compile a list of the most frequent and prominent scholarly journals to publish research on Asian American psychology, to become an important resource for scholars in the field. The Annual Review of Asian American Psychology 2014 provides a comprehensive snapshot of current state of the field in Asian American psychology today.

AAJP Volume 6, Issue 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available for download through PsycNET]

[Feature Article] Annual review of Asian American Psychology, 2014.
Kim, Su Yeong; Shen, Yishan; Hou, Yang; Tilton, Kelsey E.; Juang, Linda; Wang, Yijie

Community integration of Burmese refugees in the United States.
Lee, Sungkyu; Choi, Sunha; Proulx, Laurel; Cornwell, Jennifer

The role of cultural beliefs in disordered eating among Asian-American women.
Tsong, Yuying; Smart, Rebekah

Depressive symptoms in South Asian, East Asian, and European Americans: Evidence for ethnic differences in coping with academic versus interpersonal stress?
Perera, Marisa J.; Chang, Edward C.

Effects of becoming a mother on the development of ethnic and racial identities in Korean transnationally and transracially adopted women.
Day, Stephanie C.; Godon-Decoteau, Danielle; Suyemoto, Karen L.

AAJP September 2015 Feature Article and TOC

By | AAJP, Announcements, Member Spotlight, Research | No Comments

The Asian American Journal of Psychology (AAJP) Editorial Board is pleased to share the contents of the September 2015 issue. The Feature Article for this issue is Racial Identity Profiles of Asian‐White Biracial Young Adults: Testing a Theoretical Model With Cultural and Psychological Correlates.

Dr. Chong was interviewed by AAPA and Division on Students member, Chak Wong. Learn more about Dr. Chong and the inspiration for this study below. You can also peruse the rest of the issue’s Table of Contents.

Q & A with Dr. Vanessa Chong 

Dr. Vanessa Chong

Dr. Vanessa Chong

General Background:
Dr. Vanessa Chong, PhD grew up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and attended graduate school for Clinical Psychology at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, where she became interested in cross-cultural research. Particularly, her master’s thesis explored the perceived acculturation discrepancies between Asian-Canadian young adults and their parents how family variables correlated with psychological adjustment. Her Asian-White biracial Canadian identity sparked further exploration of the extent to which Asian-White biracial experiences are similar and different from monoracial Asian individuals. In collaboration with her supervisor, Dr. Ben Kuo PhD, a full professor at the University of Windsor, her doctoral research (a portion of which was recently published in the AAJP) utilized a mixed methods study to investigate the interrelationships between biracial identity, family variables, psychological adjustment, and internalized oppression. Currently, she is working as a Clinical Psychologist in a community mental health clinic in Calgary.

How did you become interested in this topic?
Psychology researchers are known for studying themselves, and I was no exception! I primarily became interested in this topic due to my own experiences with growing up as a biracial individual. Although interracial marriages and biracial children are becoming increasingly common, when I was growing up, my sister and I were the only biracial kids in our school. Being biracial truly shaped our growing up years. I can vividly remember an encounter when I was about 6 when my sister and I were in a mall and a homeless man insisted on giving us each $5 “for the children of Vietnam.” He had assumed that our White mother must have adopted us because we didn’t look like her! I have always been curious about whether other biracial people had similar experiences.

Can you tell us a little bit about your current line of research?
In my current work I am primarily a clinician, but I believe that an important part of being a good Psychologist is applying research to clinical practice. I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a number of clients from various ethnic backgrounds, including some biracial clients. I think it is especially important to discuss and normalize the biracial identity development process in therapy, as it can sometimes be complicated and challenging. There are some experiences that are unique to biracial individuals and should be discussed in therapy,. Coming to terms with one’s racial identity is a therapy goal that can be overlooked. In addition, my research looks at internalized oppression. I find it interesting that this is a relatively common experience among both monoracial minorities and biracial individuals, yet there is relatively little research on this topic. What’s more, it is a topic that clients may not bring up in therapy, as they may have shame associated with it. In the future, I may consider publishing some really interesting qualitative data on internalized oppression from my dissertation.

Any interesting tidbits you would like to share?
My research on Asian-White biracial individuals has been a really personally meaningful endeavor. I was able to collect a large amount of data from a fairly large sample (330 participants) from all over the US and Canada in a span of only three months. My participants were eager to answer questions about their experiences, and I actually received several messages thanking me for doing this research. I think this is because biracial people are so rarely studied and a common experience for biracial people involves feeling overlooked and not included. I feel honored that I was able to give them a voice through my research. In doing this research, I also felt increasingly connected to a community of people that I didn’t even know I was part of! This research helped me in my own journey of biracial identity development and, because of that, it will always hold a special place in my heart.

(Interview by Chak Wong, AAPA and Division on Students Member)

 


 

ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
Table of Contents – June 2015

Feature Article: Racial Identity Profiles of Asian‐White Biracial Young Adults: Testing a Theoretical Model With Cultural and Psychological Correlates
Vanessa Chong and Ben C.H. Kuo

Moderating Effects of Perceived Language Discrimination on Mental Health Outcomes Among Chinese International Students
Meifen Wei; Ya-Shu Liang; Yi Du; Raquel Botello and Chun-I Li

Asian Values, Personal and Family Perfectionism, and Mental Health Among Asian Indians in the United States
Bindu Methikalam; Kenneth T. Wang; Robert B. Slaney and Jeffrey G. Yeung

Maternal Meta‐Emotion and Child Socio‐Emotional Functioning In Immigrant Indian and White American Families
Suchi S. Daga; Vaishali V. Raval and Stacey P. Raj

Asian American Phenotypicality and Experiences of Psychological Distress: More Than Meets the Eyes
Matthew Lee and Christina J. Thai

Changes in Academic Aspirations and Expectations Among Asian American Adolescents
Lisa Kiang; Melissa Witkow; Laura Gonzalez; Gabriela Stein and Kandace Andrews

The Sociocultural Context of Caregiving Experiences for Vietnamese Dementia Family Caregivers
Oanh L. Meyer; Kim Hanh Nguyen; To Nhu Dao; Phuoc Vu; Patricia Arean and Ladson Hinton

Pathways Among Asian Americans’ Family Ethnic Socialization, Ethnic Identity, and Psychological Well‐Being: A Multigroup Mediation Model
Chi P. Nguyen; Y. Joel Wong; Linda Juang and Irene J.K. Park

A Long‐Term Therapeutic Journey With an Asian “Parachute Kid”
Teresa A. Mok

Book Review: Brown Skin, White Minds: Filipino‐American Postcolonial Psychology
Gauthamie Poolokasingham