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AAPA Statement Against Religious Hate Crimes

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We are horrified and grief-stricken by the multiple tragedies that have taken place in the last two weeks. AAPA leadership was still processing and working on our words of solidarity in response to the Sri Lanka murders (Sunday, April 21, 2019) when the shooting at the Chabad of Poway Synagogue (Saturday, April 27, 2019) occurred in San Diego, CA.

As an organization we unequivocally condemn such acts of hate and violence and commit to supporting victims, families, and communities during these difficult times.  For many individuals and communities religion and spirituality are fundamental components of psychological and community health. As such,  we are especially concerned about the persistent onslaught of violence impacting ethnic, racial, and religious communities both within the U.S. and abroad. We urge our membership to remain vigilant in considering the impact of losing a sense of safety in one’s spiritual home. Whether in Christchurch or Louisiana, Oak Creek or Pittsburgh- these cowardly attacks are an affront to us all.

As an organization committed to advancing the mental health and well-being of Asian Americans, we are cognizant of the media’s highlighting of mental illness as a precipitant to some of the tragedies. We are intent on differentiating mental health from acts of hate and violence. Facts indicate that the vast majority of those living with mental health conditions do not commit acts of violence.

In the wake of recent tragedies, we advise that each of us remain mindful not to give in to divisiveness by stereotyping entire communities for the hateful actions of a few. We also advise you to acknowledge history and systems of oppression that implicitly or explicitly perpetuate such hate and violence. We need to stand together, united in combating hatred and denouncing acts of violence.

If you or your family are impacted by these events, we encourage you to make yourself a priority and make space for your personal self-care and that of your community. We also encourage you to consider reaching out to your family, friends, religious and spiritual institutions, mental health professionals, and local community and support groups.

For allies and supporters, we encourage you to reach out to folks within your network to allow space for sharing, venting, grieving, fear, and any other emotions that might arise. Make your allyship local and visible. Note that it is important to provide validation for those communities most impacted. At this critical time, we encourage continuing to build a sense of strength through love and community– all of which have been shown to support healing and mental health.

In Solidarity,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

RESOURCES

Managing your Distress in the Wake of Mass Shooting

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting

Building Resilience to Manage Indirect Exposure to Terror

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/terror-exposure

How to talk to Children about difficult news

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/talking-to-children

HATE CRIME RESOURCES

American Psychological Association on the Psychology of Hate Crimes

https://www.apa.org/advocacy/interpersonal-violence/hate-crimes

Southern Poverty legal Center – Resources for Fighting Hate Groups and Teaching Tolerance

https://www.splcenter.org/teaching-tolerance

Southern Poverty legal Center -10 ways to fight hate – Community response

https://www.splcenter.org/20170814/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

SRI LANKA RESOURCES

Sri Lanka Red Cross

https://slredcross.give.asia/campaign/support-the-victims-of-sri-lanka-bombings

Kind Hearted Lankans

https://www.kindheartedlankans.com

If you need assistance with locating a missing relative, please contact your local Red Cross office here  and ask to speak to a case worker.

CHABAD POWAY DONATION SITE

https://www.chabadpoway.com/templates/fundraising/default_cdo/aid/4365672/jewish/Campaign.htm

AAPA Response to APA Racism Video

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Friday, August 24, 2018

Dear APA and OEMA,

We, the Executive Committee of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), are writing in response to the recently released first web video titled “Racism in American” in a series on Race and Health (http://www.apa.org/education/undergrad/diversity/default.aspx). It has come to our attention that there is a glaring omission of Asian American and Pacific Islander experiences of racism in the video. We are thankful that Dr. Jude Bergkamp, an AAPA member, was included in the video. However, AAPI experiences of racism were not explicitly discussed in this video, leaving us with images but remaining “voiceless.”

It is our understanding that  APA requested feedback from AAPA members and had previously received critiques of the missing AAPI experiences and experts. Recommendations were made, yet unheeded, to include additional images and voices that reflected AAPI experiences of racism, including the  targeting of Sikhs, deportation of Asian Americans, killing of Vincent Chin, exploitation of labor, and examples of hate crimes. We are especially disappointed to hear that APA received this feedback prior to the video’s release. However, it appears as though the feedback was not implemented.

We believe that the omission of Asian American experiences from this first video is fixable and request that APA and OEMA follow through with remedying this situation. Tiffany Townsend has been tireless and gracious in describing the process that led to the introductory video, we understand the information that has been provided about the process that led to the invisibility of our members and their experience, we respectfully request that APA acknowledge its omission and correct this error. We understand that Asian American psychologists and experiences will be included in subsequent videos. However, the omission of these experiences from this first video perpetuates the invisibility of AAPIs as a racialized group that experiences racism and the misnomer that AAPIs are “honorary whites” and perpetuates the “model minority” myth instead of recognizing us as a compilation of ethnic communities of color.

AAPA recognizes and applauds the value of this video effort. We do intend to share this resource with our membership but would be remiss in doing so without addressing the hurtful invisibility of AAPI experiences. As a group we have already endured decades of being “othered” or nonexistent in psychology research and efforts. Our community’s representation is especially important, particularly as South Asian, refugee, and undocumented AAPI’s are particularly targeted in the current political climate.

We remain committed to ongoing dialogue and constructive shared efforts.

Respectfully,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

AAPA Press Release: DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

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DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 6, 2017

Contact: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.,

President, Asian American Psychological Association

kevin.nadal@aapaonline.org | aapaonline.org

NEW YORK: The Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA) strongly condemns the repeal of Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals. With this recent decision, 800,000 DREAMers, who arrived to the U.S. as children, will no longer be protected under federal law and may be deported after 6 months. It is estimated that 16,000 young Asian Americans are currently DACA recipients, and that only about a quarter of eligible Korean (24%), Filipino (26%), and Asian Indians (28%) even applied for the program in the first two years. Thus, there are thousands of other undocumented Asian Americans who could have benefitted from this program.

AAPA recognizes that Asian Americans have experienced many discriminatory immigration laws throughout history- including the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (which was the first ban of immigrants from any country and had permanently prevented all Chinese people from entering the US); the Asian Exclusion Act of 1924 (which limited the number of immigrants to 2% of the total number of people from that country already in the US); the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 (which set a quota of 50 Filipinos per year); and the Luce–Celler Act of 1946 (which set an annual quota of 100 for Asian Indians and Filipinos). Due to anti-Asian sentiment, the Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935 provided government funding for transportation to Filipino who promised to never return to the US. However, the majority stayed because they wanted the chance to fulfill their American dreams, and the Supreme Court found the legislation to be unconstitutional.

 

While the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 put an end to immigration quotas, we must remember the history of immigration for Asian Americans – in order to contextualize, and empathize with, DACA recipients and other DREAMers today. Like these earlier immigrants from Asia and other countries who came without documentation, DREAMers merely want the opportunity to thrive in the land of opportunity. DACA recipients are teachers, attorneys, community organizers, health care workers, students, and more. They came to this country as children; they are just as American as those who are born in the US. While there is no logical reason to repeal this program, there are dozens of reasons of why it would be bad for our country – economic loss, dismantled families, mental health consequences for all involved, and more. These Americans should not be criminalized. They did nothing wrong. They cannot be “sent home”; the US is their home.

 

AAPA calls on our U.S. Congress to stop the repeal of DACA, as it threatens the mental health of undocumented families and of all immigrants in general. In his recent essay, Dr. E.J. David, an Associate Professor at the University of Alaska describes the detrimental impact of discrimination on the mental health of immigrants.  He urges: “The U.S. Congress has the power to relieve at least 800,000 people and their families the burden of carrying unnecessary stress. Our elected representatives have the power to stop the stress and its many negative consequences. They have the power to stop the oppression.”

 

Finally to all DREAMers and other undocumented Americans, AAPA pledges to support you; stand with you; and fight with you. As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. so eloquently stated, “No one is free until we are all free.”

 

The mission of the Asian American Psychological Association is to advance the mental health and well-being of Asian American communities through research, professional practice, education, and policy.

(http://aapaonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/AAPA-Statement_DACA-Repeal.pdf)

AAPA Statement Against Racial Violence and Hatred

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AAPA Statement Against Racial Violence and Hatred

The Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA) condemns the racism, domestic terrorism and hatred perpetrated by White supremacist and neo-Nazi groups in recent weeks, particularly in Charlottesville, Virginia. We extend our condolences to the family of Heather Heyer, the state troopers who were killed, and the injured peaceful protesters during this assault.

In 2017, it is a mistake to believe our nation is immune to racial attack. As Asian Americans, we recognize the legacy of White supremacy and racism in the United States which continues to affect and traumatize communities of color. To imply that those who fight racism and those who perpetrate it have similar intentions is to demean the suffering and courageous acts of our predecessors, many of whom gave their lives in a fight against intolerance. For these reasons, we join the Association for Black Psychologists (ABPsi), the American Psychological Association (APA), the National Council on Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA), and many other organizations in unequivocally rejecting the hateful acts of these groups and call on others to do the same.

We denounce all forms of racism and bigotry – from the increased number of hate crimes in recent months to the microaggressions that people of color face in their daily lives. Since its inception, AAPA has understood the damaging effects of racism, discrimination, and race-based trauma, which often lead to significant consequences for mental health, physical health, and one’s ability to thrive. As Asian Americans, we share in the fear, mourning, and outrage that our communities are experiencing in the face of prejudice and oppression. We stand in solidarity with communities who have been targeted most by this hate – particularly Black, Jewish, Latinx, Muslim, Sikhs, and LGBTQ people.

AAPA recommits to our members, and to those affected, that we will actively stand with you in these moments. We will continue to protect the rights of disenfranchised communities as they fight for social justice, equity and healing. We are with you.

In Solidarity,

Asian American Psychological Association

 

Resources

Family Care, Community Care and Self Care Toolkit: Healing in the Face of Cultural Trauma

https://d3i6fh83elv35t.cloudfront.net/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/07-20-16-EEC-Trauma-Response-Community-and-SelfCare-TookKit-1.pdf

Racial Trauma Black Lives Matter Meditation http://drcandicenicole.com/2016/07/black-lives-matter-meditation/

Charlottesville Solidarity Events by U.S. Region

http://act.indivisibleguide.com/event/stand-in-solidarity-with-charlottesville/

RYSE Presents: Revealing White Privilege and Racial Trauma

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR9ssA1b0yo

People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project

http://diorvargas.com/poc-mental-illness/

 

* This statement was written by Alexandra Rivera, Devika Srivastava, Jennifer Hsia, Fanny Ng, Helen Hsu, Richelle Concepcion, Kevin Nadal, and the AAPA Policy Committee