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AAPA Response to APA Racism Video

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Friday, August 24, 2018

Dear APA and OEMA,

We, the Executive Committee of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), are writing in response to the recently released first web video titled “Racism in American” in a series on Race and Health (http://www.apa.org/education/undergrad/diversity/default.aspx). It has come to our attention that there is a glaring omission of Asian American and Pacific Islander experiences of racism in the video. We are thankful that Dr. Jude Bergkamp, an AAPA member, was included in the video. However, AAPI experiences of racism were not explicitly discussed in this video, leaving us with images but remaining “voiceless.”

It is our understanding that  APA requested feedback from AAPA members and had previously received critiques of the missing AAPI experiences and experts. Recommendations were made, yet unheeded, to include additional images and voices that reflected AAPI experiences of racism, including the  targeting of Sikhs, deportation of Asian Americans, killing of Vincent Chin, exploitation of labor, and examples of hate crimes. We are especially disappointed to hear that APA received this feedback prior to the video’s release. However, it appears as though the feedback was not implemented.

We believe that the omission of Asian American experiences from this first video is fixable and request that APA and OEMA follow through with remedying this situation. Tiffany Townsend has been tireless and gracious in describing the process that led to the introductory video, we understand the information that has been provided about the process that led to the invisibility of our members and their experience, we respectfully request that APA acknowledge its omission and correct this error. We understand that Asian American psychologists and experiences will be included in subsequent videos. However, the omission of these experiences from this first video perpetuates the invisibility of AAPIs as a racialized group that experiences racism and the misnomer that AAPIs are “honorary whites” and perpetuates the “model minority” myth instead of recognizing us as a compilation of ethnic communities of color.

AAPA recognizes and applauds the value of this video effort. We do intend to share this resource with our membership but would be remiss in doing so without addressing the hurtful invisibility of AAPI experiences. As a group we have already endured decades of being “othered” or nonexistent in psychology research and efforts. Our community’s representation is especially important, particularly as South Asian, refugee, and undocumented AAPI’s are particularly targeted in the current political climate.

We remain committed to ongoing dialogue and constructive shared efforts.

Respectfully,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

AAPA Press Release: DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

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DACA Repeal Is Harmful for Immigrant Mental Health

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 6, 2017

Contact: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.,

President, Asian American Psychological Association

kevin.nadal@aapaonline.org | aapaonline.org

NEW YORK: The Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA) strongly condemns the repeal of Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals. With this recent decision, 800,000 DREAMers, who arrived to the U.S. as children, will no longer be protected under federal law and may be deported after 6 months. It is estimated that 16,000 young Asian Americans are currently DACA recipients, and that only about a quarter of eligible Korean (24%), Filipino (26%), and Asian Indians (28%) even applied for the program in the first two years. Thus, there are thousands of other undocumented Asian Americans who could have benefitted from this program.

AAPA recognizes that Asian Americans have experienced many discriminatory immigration laws throughout history- including the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (which was the first ban of immigrants from any country and had permanently prevented all Chinese people from entering the US); the Asian Exclusion Act of 1924 (which limited the number of immigrants to 2% of the total number of people from that country already in the US); the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 (which set a quota of 50 Filipinos per year); and the Luce–Celler Act of 1946 (which set an annual quota of 100 for Asian Indians and Filipinos). Due to anti-Asian sentiment, the Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935 provided government funding for transportation to Filipino who promised to never return to the US. However, the majority stayed because they wanted the chance to fulfill their American dreams, and the Supreme Court found the legislation to be unconstitutional.

 

While the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 put an end to immigration quotas, we must remember the history of immigration for Asian Americans – in order to contextualize, and empathize with, DACA recipients and other DREAMers today. Like these earlier immigrants from Asia and other countries who came without documentation, DREAMers merely want the opportunity to thrive in the land of opportunity. DACA recipients are teachers, attorneys, community organizers, health care workers, students, and more. They came to this country as children; they are just as American as those who are born in the US. While there is no logical reason to repeal this program, there are dozens of reasons of why it would be bad for our country – economic loss, dismantled families, mental health consequences for all involved, and more. These Americans should not be criminalized. They did nothing wrong. They cannot be “sent home”; the US is their home.

 

AAPA calls on our U.S. Congress to stop the repeal of DACA, as it threatens the mental health of undocumented families and of all immigrants in general. In his recent essay, Dr. E.J. David, an Associate Professor at the University of Alaska describes the detrimental impact of discrimination on the mental health of immigrants.  He urges: “The U.S. Congress has the power to relieve at least 800,000 people and their families the burden of carrying unnecessary stress. Our elected representatives have the power to stop the stress and its many negative consequences. They have the power to stop the oppression.”

 

Finally to all DREAMers and other undocumented Americans, AAPA pledges to support you; stand with you; and fight with you. As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. so eloquently stated, “No one is free until we are all free.”

 

The mission of the Asian American Psychological Association is to advance the mental health and well-being of Asian American communities through research, professional practice, education, and policy.

(http://aapaonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/AAPA-Statement_DACA-Repeal.pdf)

AAJP Vol. 8, No. 2, featuring “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization” by Thai et al

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2017 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization
by Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2017 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Christina J. Thai, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Christina J. Thai

Christina J. Thai graduated from James Madison University in 2013 with bachelor’s degrees in biology and psychology. Christina was a member of JMU’s Cultural and Racial Diversity Studies (CARDS) Lab for three years. As a research assistant, she worked on several projects, including one examining the relationship between Asian Americans’ phenotypic characteristics and experiences of racial microaggressions. After graduation, Christina attended Loyola University Maryland, where she received a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology. With the guidance of her advisor, Dr. Heather Lyons, Christina successfully completed her thesis on the role of racial socialization as a moderator for experiences of racial microaggressions and self-esteem in Asian American emerging adults. She is now a Counseling Psychology Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland and is a member of the Culture, Race, and Health Lab working with Dr. Matt Miller. When Christina isn’t otherwise occupied as a die-hard Pittsburgh Penguin fan or an amateur Netflix critic she is busy creating a business plan for her potato themed food truck. Christina hopes to continue studying racial socialization and is currently developing her dissertation idea.

Reflections from the Lead Author

When we were asked to reflect on the interesting, fun, or challenging experiences we encountered while writing up this study we thought of many – traveling to present our research, working with a smart and fun team, and emailing and skyping one another constantly. We also reflected on a parallel process we experienced when submitting this study on microaggressions for presentation at a research event at our home institution. Our peer reviewers responded that they would be happy to include our poster in the research event, after we changed references to “microaggressions” to “perceived microaggressions” without asking that we make a similar change to the other study variables that were also measured using self report. Fortunately, around the same time we received feedback on our submission, Dr. Kira Hudson Banks had published “’Perceived’ discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology” in the American Psychologist. Dr. Banks’ article allowed us to ground our reaction to the review in research and even a bit of humor. According to Dr. Banks “Aliens, extraterrestrial beings, and phantom limbs are ‘perceived’” (p. 312). Asking that we insert the word “perceived” for only one study variable might have two consequences. Like phantom limbs, readers might recognize microaggressions as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver. Second, as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver it also removes a perpetrator from the interaction. This experience, and the insights Dr. Banks facilitated, helped us understand the importance of continuing to present and publish on microaggressions to bolster understanding and credibility of this construct.

Banks, K. H. (2014). “Perceived” discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology. American Psychologist, 69, 311–313. doi:10.1037/a0035734

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization [Free download of article]
Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

Reciprocal Relations Between Social Self-Efficacy and Loneliness Among Chinese International Students
William Tsai, Kenneth T. Wang, and Meifen Wei

Social Anxiety in Asian Americans: Integrating Personality and Cultural Factors 
J. Hannah Lee and A. Timothy Church

Parenting Variables Associated With Growth Mindset: An Examination of Three Chinese-Heritage Samples 
Joanna J. Kim, Joey Fung, Qiaobing Wu, Chao Fang, and Anna S. Lau

Loss of Face, Intergenerational Family Conflict, and Depression Among Asian American and European American College Students 
Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T. L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, and Yang Chen

Mental-Illness Stigma Among Korean Immigrants: Role of Culture and Destigmatization Strategies 
Meekyung Han, Rachel Cha, Hyun Ah Lee, and Sang E. Lee

Developing Minority Leaders: Key Success Factors of Asian Americans 
Thomas Sy, Susanna Tram-Quon, and Alex Leung

An Examination of Attitudes Toward Gender and Sexual Violence Among Asian Indians in the United States
Pratyusha Tummala-Narra, Jaclyn Houston-Kolnik, Nina Sathasivam-Rueckert, and Megan Greeson

MMPI-2 Profiles Among Asian American Missionary Candidates: Gendered Comparisons for Ethnicity and Population Norms
Christopher H. Rosik, Grecia Rosel, Meg M. Slivoskey, Katie M. Ogdon, Ian K. Roos, Tiffany M. Kincaid, and Mandalyn R. Castanon


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/06/03/aajp-vol-8-no-2/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting

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AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting

June 14, 2016

AAPA offers our condolences and ongoing support in response to the horrific act of violence in Orlando, Florida this past Sunday, June 12, 2016, in the midst of Pride celebrations among the LGBTQ community. The shootings of innocent people celebrating Latin night at Pulse Nightclub is a tragedy impacting family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and the wider community who have lost their loved ones in a senseless act of violence.

We join in mourning with the many intersected communities impacted by the Orlando shootings, especially our LGBTQ AAPA members and the Division on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQQ) within AAPA. As a community-at-large, we can stand up and take actions in the face of overwhelming tragedy. We will donate what we can, be it blood to be banked or money for victims’ families and organizations that promote peace and support LGBTQ communities.

Importantly, we provide our unwavering support to stay united and protect the human rights of all. We reject hatred in all of its forms and reaffirm our commitment to opposing anti-LGBTQ and anti-Muslim bigotry. Let us stand together and not allow a single individual’s hateful actions to turn us against our Muslim brothers and sisters. We will continue to celebrate Pride Month, Ramadan, and Immigrant Heritage Month.  We urge each of us to continue to do our part by reaching out to one another, inviting dialogue, reducing stigma, and promoting access to mental health care during these difficult times. We especially urge you to continue your advocacy work and education about issues of violence, discrimination, hatred, oppression, mental illness, extremism, and the impact on all affected communities.

 

Selected Resources for Support and Information:

American Psychological Association – Managing your distress in the wake of mass shooting:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting.aspx

American Psychological Association- How to talk to children about difficult news and tragedies:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/talking-to-children.aspx

SAMHSA – Incidents on Mass Violence:

http://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline/disaster-types/mass-violence

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays:

https://www.pflag.org/

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.

AAPA President, kevin.nadal@aapaonline.org

Download Statement: [AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting 2016-06-14.pdf]