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AAJP Vol. 8, No. 2, featuring “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization” by Thai et al

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2017 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization
by Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2017 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Christina J. Thai, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Christina J. Thai

Christina J. Thai graduated from James Madison University in 2013 with bachelor’s degrees in biology and psychology. Christina was a member of JMU’s Cultural and Racial Diversity Studies (CARDS) Lab for three years. As a research assistant, she worked on several projects, including one examining the relationship between Asian Americans’ phenotypic characteristics and experiences of racial microaggressions. After graduation, Christina attended Loyola University Maryland, where she received a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology. With the guidance of her advisor, Dr. Heather Lyons, Christina successfully completed her thesis on the role of racial socialization as a moderator for experiences of racial microaggressions and self-esteem in Asian American emerging adults. She is now a Counseling Psychology Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland and is a member of the Culture, Race, and Health Lab working with Dr. Matt Miller. When Christina isn’t otherwise occupied as a die-hard Pittsburgh Penguin fan or an amateur Netflix critic she is busy creating a business plan for her potato themed food truck. Christina hopes to continue studying racial socialization and is currently developing her dissertation idea.

Reflections from the Lead Author

When we were asked to reflect on the interesting, fun, or challenging experiences we encountered while writing up this study we thought of many – traveling to present our research, working with a smart and fun team, and emailing and skyping one another constantly. We also reflected on a parallel process we experienced when submitting this study on microaggressions for presentation at a research event at our home institution. Our peer reviewers responded that they would be happy to include our poster in the research event, after we changed references to “microaggressions” to “perceived microaggressions” without asking that we make a similar change to the other study variables that were also measured using self report. Fortunately, around the same time we received feedback on our submission, Dr. Kira Hudson Banks had published “’Perceived’ discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology” in the American Psychologist. Dr. Banks’ article allowed us to ground our reaction to the review in research and even a bit of humor. According to Dr. Banks “Aliens, extraterrestrial beings, and phantom limbs are ‘perceived’” (p. 312). Asking that we insert the word “perceived” for only one study variable might have two consequences. Like phantom limbs, readers might recognize microaggressions as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver. Second, as an experience living only in the mind of the perceiver it also removes a perpetrator from the interaction. This experience, and the insights Dr. Banks facilitated, helped us understand the importance of continuing to present and publish on microaggressions to bolster understanding and credibility of this construct.

Banks, K. H. (2014). “Perceived” discrimination as an example of color-blind racial ideology’s influence on psychology. American Psychologist, 69, 311–313. doi:10.1037/a0035734

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Microaggressions and Self-Esteem in Emerging Asian American Adults: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization [Free download of article]
Christina J. Thai, Heather Z. Lyons, Matthew R. Lee, and Michiko Iwasaki

Reciprocal Relations Between Social Self-Efficacy and Loneliness Among Chinese International Students
William Tsai, Kenneth T. Wang, and Meifen Wei

Social Anxiety in Asian Americans: Integrating Personality and Cultural Factors 
J. Hannah Lee and A. Timothy Church

Parenting Variables Associated With Growth Mindset: An Examination of Three Chinese-Heritage Samples 
Joanna J. Kim, Joey Fung, Qiaobing Wu, Chao Fang, and Anna S. Lau

Loss of Face, Intergenerational Family Conflict, and Depression Among Asian American and European American College Students 
Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T. L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, and Yang Chen

Mental-Illness Stigma Among Korean Immigrants: Role of Culture and Destigmatization Strategies 
Meekyung Han, Rachel Cha, Hyun Ah Lee, and Sang E. Lee

Developing Minority Leaders: Key Success Factors of Asian Americans 
Thomas Sy, Susanna Tram-Quon, and Alex Leung

An Examination of Attitudes Toward Gender and Sexual Violence Among Asian Indians in the United States
Pratyusha Tummala-Narra, Jaclyn Houston-Kolnik, Nina Sathasivam-Rueckert, and Megan Greeson

MMPI-2 Profiles Among Asian American Missionary Candidates: Gendered Comparisons for Ethnicity and Population Norms
Christopher H. Rosik, Grecia Rosel, Meg M. Slivoskey, Katie M. Ogdon, Ian K. Roos, Tiffany M. Kincaid, and Mandalyn R. Castanon


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/06/03/aajp-vol-8-no-2/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting

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AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting

June 14, 2016

AAPA offers our condolences and ongoing support in response to the horrific act of violence in Orlando, Florida this past Sunday, June 12, 2016, in the midst of Pride celebrations among the LGBTQ community. The shootings of innocent people celebrating Latin night at Pulse Nightclub is a tragedy impacting family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and the wider community who have lost their loved ones in a senseless act of violence.

We join in mourning with the many intersected communities impacted by the Orlando shootings, especially our LGBTQ AAPA members and the Division on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQQ) within AAPA. As a community-at-large, we can stand up and take actions in the face of overwhelming tragedy. We will donate what we can, be it blood to be banked or money for victims’ families and organizations that promote peace and support LGBTQ communities.

Importantly, we provide our unwavering support to stay united and protect the human rights of all. We reject hatred in all of its forms and reaffirm our commitment to opposing anti-LGBTQ and anti-Muslim bigotry. Let us stand together and not allow a single individual’s hateful actions to turn us against our Muslim brothers and sisters. We will continue to celebrate Pride Month, Ramadan, and Immigrant Heritage Month.  We urge each of us to continue to do our part by reaching out to one another, inviting dialogue, reducing stigma, and promoting access to mental health care during these difficult times. We especially urge you to continue your advocacy work and education about issues of violence, discrimination, hatred, oppression, mental illness, extremism, and the impact on all affected communities.

 

Selected Resources for Support and Information:

American Psychological Association – Managing your distress in the wake of mass shooting:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting.aspx

American Psychological Association- How to talk to children about difficult news and tragedies:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/talking-to-children.aspx

SAMHSA – Incidents on Mass Violence:

http://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline/disaster-types/mass-violence

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays:

https://www.pflag.org/

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.

AAPA President, kevin.nadal@aapaonline.org

Download Statement: [AAPA Statement on Orlando Shooting 2016-06-14.pdf]

Asian American Psychological Association Response to the American Psychological Association’s Report of the Independent Review Relating to Ethics Guidelines, National Security Interrogations, and Torture

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July 31, 2015

The Executive Committee of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), on behalf of the AAPA, wishes to express our sadness and dismay upon reviewing the American Psychological Association (APA)’s Report of the Independent Review Relating to Ethics Guidelines, National Security Interrogations, and Torture.

This is not the first time in the history of our nation or of our profession that foundational understandings and guidelines for legal, ethical, or moral behavior have been ignored or overturned. The current situation raises echoes for us of a dark chapter in American history during World War II when – under the guise of a national security threat – over 110,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens, were imprisoned in concentration camps and denied their rights, essentially setting aside the United States Constitution. We are heartened that, unlike the experience of Japanese Americans, it did not take four decades to investigate the events and begin the process of prioritizing ethical and just processes and practices.

Although AAPA is a separate organization from APA, we recognize that the actions of APA, as the largest professional organization of psychologists, reflect on the public’s perception of psychology and psychologists more generally. Consequently AAPA, as an independent organization of psychologists, would like to voice our stance on ethical issues even as we recognize that it is up to APA and its governance to address the specific findings and shortcomings.

The AAPA condemns torture or abuse of any person, for any reason, including interrogation. As psychologists our goal is to heal, not to harm. Furthermore, we believe that ethical guidelines for psychologists should make clear the unacceptability of such practices and should be shaped by an ongoing dialogue within the profession about the meaning of “torture” and “abuse.”

As an association founded to address inequities within the field of psychology, we are disturbed by findings described in the report that suggest that the APA’s governing processes, policies, ethical guidelines, reports, and public statements were used to support or justify the development or application of oppressive or harmful practices. We are also disturbed by findings that the development of these processes and policies was influenced strongly by external bodies (e.g., the Department of Defense) and political agendas. The report further indicates that much of this influence was clandestine. Furthermore, we are deeply concerned by descriptions in the report that suggested that APA generally, and the Ethics Office specifically, prioritized advancing the economic and standing interests of the discipline and member psychologists, rather than the well being of the people and communities whom psychologists serve.

As a psychological association dedicated to addressing inequities and promoting health for all people, but particularly those historically marginalized, we assert that psychologists and psychological associations have the responsibility to prioritize beneficence to others above personal or professional advancement. Furthermore, we assert that ethical guidelines for psychologists generally, and in any specific association, should be guided by the standards of the field as developed by those with expertise in the field, through public and transparent dialogues and processes.

The findings of the Independent Review indicate that the APA moved alarmingly away from its mission to “advance the creation, communication, and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives” and its vision to be “an effective champion of the application of psychology to promote human rights, health, well being and dignity.”

We call on APA to acknowledge past errors, and engage in revising guidelines, policies, processes, and organizational culture to more fully and deliberately embrace the values and priorities above. We urge APA to develop a process that is open and transparent in order to create purposeful and sustainable change to psychology’s engagement with ethics in general and in specific relation to military involvement and torture. Furthermore, we urge the APA to shape a process that includes the multiple perspectives and diverse professional expertise of all psychologists. All psychologists, regardless of APA membership, have a stake in a common goal of individual and societal health.

Finally, we call on AAPA members and all psychologists to actively participate in rebuilding public trust in us and in our profession. There should be no doubt that our research and practice of psychology advance and promote individual, social, and systemic understanding, psychological health, well being, and justice.

Download pdf of Statement here.

AAPA Statement on Mental Health Act

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AAPA Statement on Mental Health Act

The Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA) is pleased to announce its support and appreciation for the nation’s commitment to improve mental health services through the new legislation,  “Strengthening Mental Health in Our Communities Act”, introduced May 6, 2014 by Doris Matsui (CA-06), Ron Barber (AZ-2), Diana DeGette (CO-1), Grace Napolitano (CA-32), and Paul Tonko (NY-20). The bill identifies the need for comprehensive mental health care, specifically highlighting the need for critical mental health programs, prevention, training, research, and competent community-based services for at- risk and vulnerable populations. This bill would greatly benefit many Asian American communities who lack adequate mental health treatment due to the lack of bilingual providers and barriers to access appropriate services.

The AAPA urges Asian American consumers and providers treating various Asian American communities to participate on the Mental Health Advisory Board. Additionally, the AAPA supports increased training for culturally competent behavioral health professionals serving Asian American communities, as well as resources for the growing aging Asian American population.

AAPA Policy Committee

AAPA Statement on the Isla Vista/UCSB Shooting Tragedy

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The Asian American Psychological Association expresses our deepest condolences to the victims and their loved ones affected by the senseless, violent attacks committed on May 23 in Isla Vista, California. Our thoughts are also with the UCSB community facing the losses and the challenges brought on by the tragedy. Although the causes and motives for committing any acts of mass destruction are difficult to fathom, in this particular case the perpetrator has left a digital trail indicating his deep psychological disturbances mixed with misogyny and racism. Even as we all struggle to cope with yet another unspeakable acts of violence, AAPA is committed to providing whatever resource we can offer to help those in need of healing.