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2019 Annual Convention: Call for Proposals

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MAKING WAVES AND BREAKING THROUGH THE BAMBOO CEILING: Reclaiming and Redefining Our Asian and Asian American Identities

This year’s theme building upon previous years’ themes of research, practice, and advocacy efforts with an increased focus on social justice advocacy and concrete actions to propel Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) mental health forward.

Often, culturally or via family norms, AANHPI are sent messages to keep our heads down, to conform, and to uphold the status quo. Dominant societal norms reinforce the bamboo ceiling by, restricting AANHPI achievements, and perpetuating the model minority stereotype that AANHPI individuals are studious, meek, and successful. These stereotypes are then used to keep us “visibly invisible” and minimize our experiences and needs. These dominant messages are also a divide and conquer strategy that encourages us to marginalize our own, thereby keeping the dominant power structures in place, maintaining the status quo, and preventing us from having our voices heard. Therefore, with this theme, we embrace and highlight our duty, joy, and responsibility to present our authentic selves and showcase our work in order to inspire change and promote equity.

“Making waves and breaking through the bamboo ceiling” is a call to spotlight our intersecting identities and values that enrich and strengthen our communities.  We seek to transcend outdated social norms while retaining our true selves and honoring our elders, mentors, ancestors, and allies. We gather to share the wisdom, creativity, and expertise of our own intersectional AANHPI communities from across the globe.

There is not only one definition of what it means to be Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and/or Pacific Islander. It is time for us as a community to create and define these terms and use advocacy to link with our communities beyond academia and clinical practice settings. Let us focus on ways to see and uplift each other and ourselves as enough. Let’s break down the barriers that have muted and divided us, and share strategies and wisdom as we move boldly forward together.

Abstract Submission Instructions

Proposals are due May 24, 2019 at 11:59 PM PST

IMPORTANT – READ:

**Proposals that address the convention theme will be prioritized**

**Given our timeline, we are NOT able to extend the submission deadline this year**


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

1. To submit an abstract, you must first create an account by registering on this page: (https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/userlogin/register/login)

2. After registering, Dryfta (portal company) will email you a temporary password, which you will use to sign in to the system for the first time. You will be prompted to change your password.

3. After you are logged in, click on “Abstract Submissions” at the top of the page and follow the template to complete and submit your abstract proposal


2019 AAPA CONVENTION WEBSITE:

https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/

AAPA Response to APA Racism Video

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Friday, August 24, 2018

Dear APA and OEMA,

We, the Executive Committee of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA), are writing in response to the recently released first web video titled “Racism in American” in a series on Race and Health (http://www.apa.org/education/undergrad/diversity/default.aspx). It has come to our attention that there is a glaring omission of Asian American and Pacific Islander experiences of racism in the video. We are thankful that Dr. Jude Bergkamp, an AAPA member, was included in the video. However, AAPI experiences of racism were not explicitly discussed in this video, leaving us with images but remaining “voiceless.”

It is our understanding that  APA requested feedback from AAPA members and had previously received critiques of the missing AAPI experiences and experts. Recommendations were made, yet unheeded, to include additional images and voices that reflected AAPI experiences of racism, including the  targeting of Sikhs, deportation of Asian Americans, killing of Vincent Chin, exploitation of labor, and examples of hate crimes. We are especially disappointed to hear that APA received this feedback prior to the video’s release. However, it appears as though the feedback was not implemented.

We believe that the omission of Asian American experiences from this first video is fixable and request that APA and OEMA follow through with remedying this situation. Tiffany Townsend has been tireless and gracious in describing the process that led to the introductory video, we understand the information that has been provided about the process that led to the invisibility of our members and their experience, we respectfully request that APA acknowledge its omission and correct this error. We understand that Asian American psychologists and experiences will be included in subsequent videos. However, the omission of these experiences from this first video perpetuates the invisibility of AAPIs as a racialized group that experiences racism and the misnomer that AAPIs are “honorary whites” and perpetuates the “model minority” myth instead of recognizing us as a compilation of ethnic communities of color.

AAPA recognizes and applauds the value of this video effort. We do intend to share this resource with our membership but would be remiss in doing so without addressing the hurtful invisibility of AAPI experiences. As a group we have already endured decades of being “othered” or nonexistent in psychology research and efforts. Our community’s representation is especially important, particularly as South Asian, refugee, and undocumented AAPI’s are particularly targeted in the current political climate.

We remain committed to ongoing dialogue and constructive shared efforts.

Respectfully,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

2018 AAPA Election Results

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Thank you to everyone who voted in the 2018 AAPA Elections. We welcome the newly elected AAPA leadership team members:

 

President-Elect and Vice President-Elect: Richelle Concepcion and Nellie Tran (2018 – 2020)

Division Council Representative (CoR): Gagan “Mia” Khera (2018 – 2020)

Secretary/Historian: Gloria Wong-Padoonpatt (2018 – 2020)

Board of Director: Kim Langrehr (2018 – 2020)

Student Board of Director: Swapandeep “Swap” Mushiana (2018 – 2020)

 

We would also like to express our appreciation to the outgoing Board members for their excellent leadership on the AAPA Executive Committee:

Board of Director: Marcia Liu

Student Director: Ming Tu

Secretary/Historian: Amy Kobus

Division Council of Representative (CoR): Monique Shah Kulkarni.

 

Congratulations and we look forward to a wonderful year ahead with your leadership!

AAJP Vol. 9 No. 2 featuring “Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans” by Kim-Ju, Goodman, and Her

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2018 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans
by Greg M. Kim-Ju, Zachary T. Goodman, and Susan Her

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2018 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Greg M. Kim-Ju, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 21 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Greg M. Kim-Ju

Greg Kim-Ju received his BA in Psychology from St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota and his Ph.D. in Cultural Psychology from Boston College. He later served as a community education volunteer for the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic. As a recipient of a Fulbright fellowship, he turned his attention to the ways in which young adults in South Korea grapple with their collective identities. After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Kim-Ju served as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Asian American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he examined demographic, educational, and economic characteristics of Asian Americans in Massachusetts. In the Department of Psychology at California State University, Sacramento, Dr. Kim-Ju has been teaching courses on Cross-Cultural Psychology, Multicultural Psychology, and Community Psychology, and Qualitative Research. He conducts research on ethnic identity and psychological correlates and prevention and intervention programs that address academic performance and at-risk behavior. He started the SEL Project, a high-impact and multi-component community mobilization effort aimed at facilitating social and emotional skills with K-12 students, to address bullying and academic issues in public schools.

Reflections from the Lead Author

Dr. Kim-Ju and his research team of Zachary T Goodman and Susan Her experienced firsthand what many multicultural psychologists experience in recruiting ethnic minority participants in psychology. They spent nearly a year recruiting Hmong American participants by attending a number of events and workshops and visiting organizations in the Hmong community in the Greater Sacramento area.

 

AAJP VOLUME 9, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]
FEATURE ARTICLE: Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans [Free download of article]
Greg M. Kim-Ju, Zachary T. Goodman, and Susan Her

Campus Safety Experiences of Asian American and Asian International College Students
Cara S. Maffini

Internalization of the Model Minority Myth, School Racial Composition, and Psychological Distress Among Asian American Adolescents
Annabelle L. Atkin, Hyung Chol Yoo, Justin Jager, and Christine J. Yeh

Family Perfectionism, Shame, and Mental Health Among Asian American and Asian International Emerging Adults: Mediating and Moderating Relationships
Lei Wang, Y. Joel Wong, and Y. Barry Chung

Bilinear and Multidimensional Cultural Orientations and Indigenous Family Process Among Korean Immigrant Mothers and Fathers
Yoonsun Choi, You Seung Kim, Jeanette Park Lee, Hyunjee Kim, Tae Yeun Kim, and Su Yeong Kim

Asian American and European American Emerging Adults’ Perceived Parenting Styles and Self-Regulation Ability
Jillian J. Shen, Charissa S. L. Cheah, and Jing Yu

Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale for Asian Americans: Testing the Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance Across Generational Status
Brian TaeHyuk Keum, Matthew J. Miller, Minsun Lee, and Grace A. Chen

Ethnically Heterogeneous Friendships and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety Among Filipino Americans
Janet Chang and Frank L. Samson

 


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2018/06/15/aajp-vol-9-no-2-featuring/ ‎
For more information on AAJPhttp://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychologybryankim@hawaii.edu