Category

Announcements

AAPA Statement Against Religious Hate Crimes

By | Announcements, Press Release, Statements | No Comments

We are horrified and grief-stricken by the multiple tragedies that have taken place in the last two weeks. AAPA leadership was still processing and working on our words of solidarity in response to the Sri Lanka murders (Sunday, April 21, 2019) when the shooting at the Chabad of Poway Synagogue (Saturday, April 27, 2019) occurred in San Diego, CA.

As an organization we unequivocally condemn such acts of hate and violence and commit to supporting victims, families, and communities during these difficult times.  For many individuals and communities religion and spirituality are fundamental components of psychological and community health. As such,  we are especially concerned about the persistent onslaught of violence impacting ethnic, racial, and religious communities both within the U.S. and abroad. We urge our membership to remain vigilant in considering the impact of losing a sense of safety in one’s spiritual home. Whether in Christchurch or Louisiana, Oak Creek or Pittsburgh- these cowardly attacks are an affront to us all.

As an organization committed to advancing the mental health and well-being of Asian Americans, we are cognizant of the media’s highlighting of mental illness as a precipitant to some of the tragedies. We are intent on differentiating mental health from acts of hate and violence. Facts indicate that the vast majority of those living with mental health conditions do not commit acts of violence.

In the wake of recent tragedies, we advise that each of us remain mindful not to give in to divisiveness by stereotyping entire communities for the hateful actions of a few. We also advise you to acknowledge history and systems of oppression that implicitly or explicitly perpetuate such hate and violence. We need to stand together, united in combating hatred and denouncing acts of violence.

If you or your family are impacted by these events, we encourage you to make yourself a priority and make space for your personal self-care and that of your community. We also encourage you to consider reaching out to your family, friends, religious and spiritual institutions, mental health professionals, and local community and support groups.

For allies and supporters, we encourage you to reach out to folks within your network to allow space for sharing, venting, grieving, fear, and any other emotions that might arise. Make your allyship local and visible. Note that it is important to provide validation for those communities most impacted. At this critical time, we encourage continuing to build a sense of strength through love and community– all of which have been shown to support healing and mental health.

In Solidarity,

Executive Committee

Asian American Psychological Association

RESOURCES

Managing your Distress in the Wake of Mass Shooting

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting

Building Resilience to Manage Indirect Exposure to Terror

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/terror-exposure

How to talk to Children about difficult news

https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/talking-to-children

HATE CRIME RESOURCES

American Psychological Association on the Psychology of Hate Crimes

https://www.apa.org/advocacy/interpersonal-violence/hate-crimes

Southern Poverty legal Center – Resources for Fighting Hate Groups and Teaching Tolerance

https://www.splcenter.org/teaching-tolerance

Southern Poverty legal Center -10 ways to fight hate – Community response

https://www.splcenter.org/20170814/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

SRI LANKA RESOURCES

Sri Lanka Red Cross

https://slredcross.give.asia/campaign/support-the-victims-of-sri-lanka-bombings

Kind Hearted Lankans

https://www.kindheartedlankans.com

If you need assistance with locating a missing relative, please contact your local Red Cross office here  and ask to speak to a case worker.

CHABAD POWAY DONATION SITE

https://www.chabadpoway.com/templates/fundraising/default_cdo/aid/4365672/jewish/Campaign.htm

2019 Annual Convention: Call for Proposals

By | Announcements, Call for Proposals, Convention | No Comments

MAKING WAVES AND BREAKING THROUGH THE BAMBOO CEILING: Reclaiming and Redefining Our Asian and Asian American Identities

This year’s theme building upon previous years’ themes of research, practice, and advocacy efforts with an increased focus on social justice advocacy and concrete actions to propel Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) mental health forward.

Often, culturally or via family norms, AANHPI are sent messages to keep our heads down, to conform, and to uphold the status quo. Dominant societal norms reinforce the bamboo ceiling by, restricting AANHPI achievements, and perpetuating the model minority stereotype that AANHPI individuals are studious, meek, and successful. These stereotypes are then used to keep us “visibly invisible” and minimize our experiences and needs. These dominant messages are also a divide and conquer strategy that encourages us to marginalize our own, thereby keeping the dominant power structures in place, maintaining the status quo, and preventing us from having our voices heard. Therefore, with this theme, we embrace and highlight our duty, joy, and responsibility to present our authentic selves and showcase our work in order to inspire change and promote equity.

“Making waves and breaking through the bamboo ceiling” is a call to spotlight our intersecting identities and values that enrich and strengthen our communities.  We seek to transcend outdated social norms while retaining our true selves and honoring our elders, mentors, ancestors, and allies. We gather to share the wisdom, creativity, and expertise of our own intersectional AANHPI communities from across the globe.

There is not only one definition of what it means to be Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and/or Pacific Islander. It is time for us as a community to create and define these terms and use advocacy to link with our communities beyond academia and clinical practice settings. Let us focus on ways to see and uplift each other and ourselves as enough. Let’s break down the barriers that have muted and divided us, and share strategies and wisdom as we move boldly forward together.

Abstract Submission Instructions

Proposals are due May 24, 2019 at 11:59 PM PST

IMPORTANT – READ:

**Proposals that address the convention theme will be prioritized**

**Given our timeline, we are NOT able to extend the submission deadline this year**


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

1. To submit an abstract, you must first create an account by registering on this page: (https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/userlogin/register/login)

2. After registering, Dryfta (portal company) will email you a temporary password, which you will use to sign in to the system for the first time. You will be prompted to change your password.

3. After you are logged in, click on “Abstract Submissions” at the top of the page and follow the template to complete and submit your abstract proposal


2019 AAPA CONVENTION WEBSITE:

https://aapaconvention.dryfta.com/en/

2018 AAPA Election Results

By | Announcements, News | No Comments

Thank you to everyone who voted in the 2018 AAPA Elections. We welcome the newly elected AAPA leadership team members:

 

President-Elect and Vice President-Elect: Richelle Concepcion and Nellie Tran (2018 – 2020)

Division Council Representative (CoR): Gagan “Mia” Khera (2018 – 2020)

Secretary/Historian: Gloria Wong-Padoonpatt (2018 – 2020)

Board of Director: Kim Langrehr (2018 – 2020)

Student Board of Director: Swapandeep “Swap” Mushiana (2018 – 2020)

 

We would also like to express our appreciation to the outgoing Board members for their excellent leadership on the AAPA Executive Committee:

Board of Director: Marcia Liu

Student Director: Ming Tu

Secretary/Historian: Amy Kobus

Division Council of Representative (CoR): Monique Shah Kulkarni.

 

Congratulations and we look forward to a wonderful year ahead with your leadership!

AAJP Vol. 9 No. 2 featuring “Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans” by Kim-Ju, Goodman, and Her

By | Announcements | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2018 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans
by Greg M. Kim-Ju, Zachary T. Goodman, and Susan Her

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2018 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Greg M. Kim-Ju, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 21 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Greg M. Kim-Ju

Greg Kim-Ju received his BA in Psychology from St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota and his Ph.D. in Cultural Psychology from Boston College. He later served as a community education volunteer for the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic. As a recipient of a Fulbright fellowship, he turned his attention to the ways in which young adults in South Korea grapple with their collective identities. After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Kim-Ju served as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Asian American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he examined demographic, educational, and economic characteristics of Asian Americans in Massachusetts. In the Department of Psychology at California State University, Sacramento, Dr. Kim-Ju has been teaching courses on Cross-Cultural Psychology, Multicultural Psychology, and Community Psychology, and Qualitative Research. He conducts research on ethnic identity and psychological correlates and prevention and intervention programs that address academic performance and at-risk behavior. He started the SEL Project, a high-impact and multi-component community mobilization effort aimed at facilitating social and emotional skills with K-12 students, to address bullying and academic issues in public schools.

Reflections from the Lead Author

Dr. Kim-Ju and his research team of Zachary T Goodman and Susan Her experienced firsthand what many multicultural psychologists experience in recruiting ethnic minority participants in psychology. They spent nearly a year recruiting Hmong American participants by attending a number of events and workshops and visiting organizations in the Hmong community in the Greater Sacramento area.

 

AAJP VOLUME 9, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]
FEATURE ARTICLE: Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Hmong Americans [Free download of article]
Greg M. Kim-Ju, Zachary T. Goodman, and Susan Her

Campus Safety Experiences of Asian American and Asian International College Students
Cara S. Maffini

Internalization of the Model Minority Myth, School Racial Composition, and Psychological Distress Among Asian American Adolescents
Annabelle L. Atkin, Hyung Chol Yoo, Justin Jager, and Christine J. Yeh

Family Perfectionism, Shame, and Mental Health Among Asian American and Asian International Emerging Adults: Mediating and Moderating Relationships
Lei Wang, Y. Joel Wong, and Y. Barry Chung

Bilinear and Multidimensional Cultural Orientations and Indigenous Family Process Among Korean Immigrant Mothers and Fathers
Yoonsun Choi, You Seung Kim, Jeanette Park Lee, Hyunjee Kim, Tae Yeun Kim, and Su Yeong Kim

Asian American and European American Emerging Adults’ Perceived Parenting Styles and Self-Regulation Ability
Jillian J. Shen, Charissa S. L. Cheah, and Jing Yu

Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale for Asian Americans: Testing the Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance Across Generational Status
Brian TaeHyuk Keum, Matthew J. Miller, Minsun Lee, and Grace A. Chen

Ethnically Heterogeneous Friendships and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety Among Filipino Americans
Janet Chang and Frank L. Samson

 


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2018/06/15/aajp-vol-9-no-2-featuring/ ‎
For more information on AAJPhttp://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychologybryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award

By | AAJP, Announcements, Awards | No Comments

Asian American Journal of Psychology | 2016 Best Paper Award

AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award Winner:
“You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart”: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity
by Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

(from: Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 7 No. 2, pp. 108-119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000038)

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “‘You’re Asian; You’re supposed to be smart’: Adolescents’ experiences with the Model Minority Stereotype and longitudinal links with identity,” for winning the AAJP 2016 Best Paper Award. The article was published in the June 2016 issue of Asian American Journal of Psychology. The award winners were announced at the 2017 AAPA Convention Awards Banquet by Dr. Bryan Kim, Editor of AAJP. Below is a brief biography of the authors, Drs. Taylor Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa Witkow, and their reflections on this research experience. AAPA would like to thank and recognize the award winners and all authors who continue to make outstanding contributions to AAJP.

Brief Biography of Dr. Taylor Thompson

Taylor L. Thompson earned a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University in psychology and English—creative writing. She received a master’s in psychology from Wake Forest University and a doctorate in counseling psychology and school psychology from Florida State University. She currently serves as a licensed psychologist for Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics in Jacksonville, Florida. Her research interests and projects have focused on the experiences of youth from diverse backgrounds, including Asian American adolescents, gifted and talented children, and college students with disabilities.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

 

Brief Biography of Dr. Melissa Witkow (Not Pictured)

Melissa R. Witkow is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Willamette University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from UCLA and her B.A. in Psychology from Pomona College. In her research, she studies the intersection between peer relationships and academic motivation and achievement during adolescence, and how adolescents from diverse backgrounds negotiate the demands in their lives.

 

Reflections from the Lead Author
This study grew out of a thesis project that began in our lab a decade ago. As I was first learning about the model minority stereotype, one of the things that struck me was the stereotype’s lengthy history. As stated in the paper, stereotypes of Asian Americans as an industrious wonder group grew out of Chinese immigration in the 19th century. The idea that the thoughts of people over 150 years ago could shape how people treat each other now—like some sort of strange cultural heirloom—interested me almost as much as how the stereotype has evolved over time. Asian immigrants and their ancestors have been viewed as everything from threatening invaders to pleasant high-achievers in America based on what was convenient in the sociopolitical context. After learning all of this, my biggest questions became how youth exposed to such a shifting image felt about it and how the image affected their views of themselves and their backgrounds.

To put this idea into action, our initial data collection involved putting some miles on the car traveling to a network of schools in North Carolina, some of which had relatively low densities of Asian American students. Our procedure involved calling down eligible students to a common area in the school (e.g., cafeteria, library). One distinct impression I remember was worrying over the students feeling singled out. Indeed, some appeared nervous or made jokes about being gathered in this way. However, others appeared to feel a sense of pride in being called upon as experts of their own experiences. Our co-author, Lisa, remembers many students feeling pleased that they were being studied and that someone cared about their thoughts and feelings. Either way, the data collection experience really made me take pause and wonder how the salience of this Asian American identity fluctuated for these teenagers minute-to-minute, day-to-day, and in different periods in their lives. Reflecting back now, I wonder what the study results would look like if we started over again today? Given what we know about model minority myths being propped up during times of racial tension, I wonder if the current adolescent generation’s awareness of stereotyping and the salience of their identities has changed materially from our initial group, even just 10 years later? I suppose research on an anthropological artifact like a stereotype will always be a moving target. People constantly change, and so do their opinions and relationships. Luckily for us social science researchers, there will always be ongoing questions to ask!

 


For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu