AAJP Vol. 7, No. 2, featuring “Parents and teachers’ perspectives on school bullying among elementary school-aged Asian and Latino immigrant children,” by Shea et al.

Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children
by Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Munyi Shea, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea is an associate professor in psychology at Cal State University, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on issues related to Asian and Latino immigrant mental health, cultural adjustment and school experience, as well as the development and evaluation of culturally responsive school- or community-based prevention and intervention programs. Munyi Shea received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University, and completed an APA-accredited internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center/Harvard Medical School in adult clinical psychology.

Reflections from the Lead Author
The most rewarding aspect of this project was to have parents come up to me after the focus group meetings and say how much they appreciated having a space to tell their children’s stories. I was both delighted and surprised, because, from my perspective, the most challenging part of these interviews was to get the parents talk! Most of them had never been in a research study, and felt uneasy to be in the spotlight. Some of them would conceal their nervousness through giggling, and others would avoid revealing their feelings by focusing solely on factual details. Very few of them actually referred to the children involved in bullying (whether their own or those of others) by their names.

At the time of data collection, I focused on getting all the questions asked, and felt perplexed by the accumulating “unanswered” questions that arose in the discussions. But as years have passed, what I now remember are little details – the parents’ non-verbal and facial expressions, their understated ways of showing support to each other (e.g., a pat on the shoulder, offering the Kleenex tissue paper), and their sense of camaraderie.

A fun fact: Because of the school location and the amount of time we spent on site, my research team and I ate out a lot. We sampled a wide variety of cuisines, ranging from lip-smacking street food and dim sum, to banquet-style Chinese food, earning us the reputation of the “eating” lab.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children [Free download of article]
Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

Measurement Invariance Testing of a Three-Factor Model of Parental Warmth, Psychological
Control, and Knowledge Across European and Asian/Pacific Islander American Youth

Jeremy W. Luk, Kevin M. King, Carolyn A. McCarty, Ann Vander Stoep, and Elizabeth McCauley

“You’re Asian; You’re Supposed to Be Smart”: Adolescents’ Experiences With the Model Minority
Stereotype and Longitudinal Links With Identity

Taylor L. Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

Ethnic Differences in Suicidal Ideation and Its Correlates Among South Asian American
Emerging Adults

Robert Lane, Soumia Cheref, and Regina Miranda

Do Social Constraints Always Hurt? Acculturation Moderates the Relationships Between Social
Constraints and Physical Symptoms of Chinese American Breast Cancer Survivors

Celia Ching Yee Wong and Qian Lu

The Effects of Racism-Related Stress on Asian Americans: Anxiety and Depression Among Different
Generational Statuses

Charles M. Liu and Karen L. Suyemoto


Read about the last issue of AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/2016/03/14/aajp-vol7no1/.
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

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