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AAJP Vol. 8, No. 1 Special Issue: Moving Beyond the Model Minority

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | March 2017 Issue
Description and Table of Contents

SPECIAL ISSUE: Moving Beyond the Model Minority 

This special issue of AAJP represents a collaborative effort with the Society for Research in Child Development’s Asian Caucus Steering Committee (Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Lisa Kiang, and Yijie Wang), with Virginia Huynh and Lisa Kiang serving as lead guest editors. The collection of articles in this issue represents diverse methodologies, with a common aim of further understanding the development of Asian Americans beyond the confines of the Model Minority Stereotype and inspiring new conceptual and empirical approaches. We hope that readers will find the articles in this special issue to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Introduction to this Special Issue may be downloaded for free here, and the Table of Contents is below.

AAJP VOLUME 8, ISSUE 1 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION: Moving beyond the model minority. [Free download of article]
Kiang, Lisa; Huynh, Virginia W.; Cheah, Charissa S. L.; Wang, Yijie; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

Hyper-selectivity and the remaking of culture: Understanding the Asian American achievement paradox.
Zhou, Min; Lee, Jennifer

Academic social support and student expectations: The case of second-generation Asian Americans.
Cherng, Hua-Yu Sebastian; Liu, Jia-Lin

Are they political? Examining Asian American college students’ civic engagement.
Wray-Lake, Laura; Tang, Julia; Victorino, Christine

Losing Kapwa: Colonial legacies and the Filipino American family.
David, E. J. R.; Sharma, Dinghy Kristine B.; Petalio, Jessica

Disentangling the myth: Social relationships and Filipino American adolescents’ experiences of the model minority stereotype.
Rodriguez-Operana, Victoria C.; Mistry, Rashmita S.; Chen, Yu Jung

Stigma consciousness, racial microaggressions, and sleep disturbance among Asian Americans.
Ong, Anthony D.; Cerrada, Christian; Lee, Rebecca A.; Williams, David R.


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2017/05/01/aajp-vol-8-no-1/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAJP Vol. 7, No. 4 featuring “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015” by Kiang et al.

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | December 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Lisa Kiang

Dr. Lisa Kiang

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015
by Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Lisa Kiang, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the December 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Lisa Kiang

Lisa Kiang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Denver and received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her primary research interests are in the intersections of self and identity, family and social relationships, and culture, with a focus on adolescents from immigrant and ethnic minority backgrounds. Major themes include relational or contextual influences on identity formation, and culturally protective factors in promoting development and well-being.

Reflections from the Lead Author
I have sort of a love-hate relationship with technology, and my emotions certainly fluctuated to the extremes while collaborating on this paper. To start, though, I am deeply grateful to have had the opportunity to take on the important and enormous challenge of reviewing the outstanding research on Asian Americans published in 2015. It was rewarding and inspiring to see the quality of cutting-edge research focusing on this distinctive population. And in terms of sheer quantity, coordinating the coding, summary, review, and synthesis of hundreds upon hundreds of articles is no small feat and would never have been possible without the help from my small, but mighty, research lab and from my co-authors from the SRCD Asian Caucus. Indeed, one of the biggest tasks in working on this project was figuring out how to manage the process of coding articles for inclusion in the review. After consulting with one of my university’s reference librarians early on, I decided that using a combination of EbscoHost folders and Zotero would be one of the best ways to filter through abstracts and identify the final set of articles that met the criteria for inclusion—and this is where the “hate” comes in. These software programs and I had some words during the coding process, some pretty nasty words. And there were tears, mostly on my part. Some fists were even raised. Yet, in the end, glitches were resolved, inconsistencies were addressed, and no severe damage was done. After completing this project, Zotero and I decided we would take a little bit of break from each other, spend some time apart, but I think we’ll still be friends. The “love” aspect of my relationship with technology can be illustrated by the fact that much of the preparation and writing of this paper was handled internationally. I had the great fortune to teach in Vienna, Austria during the Spring of 2016 (more detailed teaching escapades can be found at http://www.s-r-a.org/announcements/blog/2016-05-17-teaching-semester-vienna-connecting-cultural-experiences-class-concept). Through technology, I was able to very efficiently and effectively communicate with my coding team and co-authors, whether it be via e-mails, electronic servers, shared folders, or online communication platforms. These days, it no longer seems remarkable to hold a meeting when attendees are distributed across multiple states and two or more continents, but it is the beauty and power of technology that makes such collaboration feasible and fun.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2015 [Free download of article]
Lisa Kiang, Charissa Cheah, Virginia Huynh, Yijie Wang, and Hirozaku Yoshikawa

Asian American Men’s Internalization of Western Media Appearance Ideals, Social Comparison, and Acculturative Stress
Brian TaeHyuk Keum

Parent-Child Closeness and Acculturation in Predicting Racial Preference in Mate Selection among Asian Americans 
Quyen T. Sklar, Jenny H. Pak, and Stacy Eltiti

Big 5 Personality and Subjective Well-Being in Asian Americans: Testing Optimism and Pessimism as Mediators
P. Priscilla Lui, David Rollock, Edward C. Chang, Frederick F. T. Leong, and Byron L. Zamboanga

Does Endorsement of the Model Minority Myth Relate to Anti-Asian Sentiments among White College Students? The Role of a Color-blind Racial Attitude
Sarah J. Parks and Hyung Chol Yoo

Associations among Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Trust in Provider, and Treatment Adherence among Predominantly Low-Income Asian American Patients
Shuchang Kang, Carolyn M. Tucker, Guillermo M. Wippold, Michael Marsiske, and Paige H. Wegener


Read about the last issue of AAJPhttps://aapaonline.org/2016/11/04/aajp-vol-7-no-4/
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu

AAPA Receives the APA Public Interest Leadership Conference (PILC) Health Equity Dissemination Award

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AAPA Receives the APA Public Interest Leadership Conference (PILC) Health Equity Dissemination Award

  

AAPA members Dr. Sumie Okazaki, Ulash Thakore-Dunlap LMFT, Dr. Cixin Wang, and Dr. Munyi Shea received the APA PILC award to work on creating and disseminating a resource based on guidelines on bullying and victimization among Asian American and Pacfic Islanders (AAPI) K-12 students to school professionals and parents.

AAPA aims to address the lack of knowledge and resources on AAPI students experiencing bullying in the community by creating a practical resource for teachers and parents on AAPI bullying and to disseminate the materials online in ways that are accessible by school administrators, academic counselors, school-based mental health professionals, teachers, and to parents.

AAPA will plan to print a sample batch of the guidelines in 4 languages (Chinese, English, Korean, and Vietnamese) to distribute through conferences and workshops. We plan to also disseminate the guidelines electronically by sharing the products and materials with the APA Safe and Supportive Schools Program as well as other social media tools and websites, making it accessible to all. 

In 2017, AAPA looks forward to sharing the final resource pack with you.

2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Dr. Jan Estrellado & Dr. Susan Han

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It is with great pride and excitement that we announce the 2016 AAPA Leadership Fellows: Jan Estrellado, Ph.D. & Susan Han, Ph.D.

Please join in congratulating and welcoming them!

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Jan Estrellado

Dr. Estrellado earned her PhD in clinical psychology with a research focus on trauma and multicultural issues. She specifically studies the experiences of ethnic minority trauma survivors in therapy. Her clinical practice includes working with people suffering from anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. She is currently a lecturer at San Diego State University and a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Stress and Anxiety Management in San Diego, California. She has experience working with teens, adults, and older adults at community mental health treatment centers, psychiatric hospitals, and private practice settings. Before entering the psychology field, she worked as the Assistant Director at the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center and as the Assistant Resident Dean at the University of California, San Diego.

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Susan Han

Dr. Han is a licensed psychologist who is currently working at the Counseling Center at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as the Assistant Director of Mental Health Promotion, Outreach and Evaluation. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from George Mason University, completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of Michigan and a post-doctoral residency year at Cornell University Counseling & Psychological Services. Dr. Han is integrative in her approach to therapy, drawing upon humanistic and cognitive-behavioral theories. Her special interests include multicultural identity development and promotion of psychological health and wellness.

Best,
Richelle Conception & Nellie Tran
AAPA Leadership Fellow Co-Chairs

AAJP Vol. 7, No. 2, featuring “Parents and teachers’ perspectives on school bullying among elementary school-aged Asian and Latino immigrant children,” by Shea et al.

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Asian American Journal of Psychology | June 2016 Issue
Feature Article & Table of Contents

Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea

FEATURE ARTICLE:

Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children
by Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

AAPA would like to congratulate the authors of “Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children,” which has been chosen as the Feature Article of the June 2016 issue. Below is a brief biography of the lead author, Dr. Munyi Shea, and some reflections on this research experience. We hope that the readers of AAJP will find this Feature and the rest of the issue’s articles to be informative and of benefit to their work. The Feature Article may be downloaded for free here, and the June 2016 issue’s Table of Contents is at the end of this post.

Brief Biography of Dr. Munyi Shea

Dr. Munyi Shea is an associate professor in psychology at Cal State University, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on issues related to Asian and Latino immigrant mental health, cultural adjustment and school experience, as well as the development and evaluation of culturally responsive school- or community-based prevention and intervention programs. Munyi Shea received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University, and completed an APA-accredited internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center/Harvard Medical School in adult clinical psychology.

Reflections from the Lead Author
The most rewarding aspect of this project was to have parents come up to me after the focus group meetings and say how much they appreciated having a space to tell their children’s stories. I was both delighted and surprised, because, from my perspective, the most challenging part of these interviews was to get the parents talk! Most of them had never been in a research study, and felt uneasy to be in the spotlight. Some of them would conceal their nervousness through giggling, and others would avoid revealing their feelings by focusing solely on factual details. Very few of them actually referred to the children involved in bullying (whether their own or those of others) by their names.

At the time of data collection, I focused on getting all the questions asked, and felt perplexed by the accumulating “unanswered” questions that arose in the discussions. But as years have passed, what I now remember are little details – the parents’ non-verbal and facial expressions, their understated ways of showing support to each other (e.g., a pat on the shoulder, offering the Kleenex tissue paper), and their sense of camaraderie.

A fun fact: Because of the school location and the amount of time we spent on site, my research team and I ate out a lot. We sampled a wide variety of cuisines, ranging from lip-smacking street food and dim sum, to banquet-style Chinese food, earning us the reputation of the “eating” lab.

 

AAJP VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
[Articles available on APA PsycNET]

FEATURE ARTICLE: Parents and Teachers’ Perspectives on School Bullying Among Elementary School-Aged Asian and Latino Immigrant Children [Free download of article]
Munyi Shea, Cixin Wang, Winnie Shi, Victor Gonzalez, and Dorothy Espeleage

Measurement Invariance Testing of a Three-Factor Model of Parental Warmth, Psychological
Control, and Knowledge Across European and Asian/Pacific Islander American Youth

Jeremy W. Luk, Kevin M. King, Carolyn A. McCarty, Ann Vander Stoep, and Elizabeth McCauley

“You’re Asian; You’re Supposed to Be Smart”: Adolescents’ Experiences With the Model Minority
Stereotype and Longitudinal Links With Identity

Taylor L. Thompson, Lisa Kiang, and Melissa R. Witkow

Ethnic Differences in Suicidal Ideation and Its Correlates Among South Asian American
Emerging Adults

Robert Lane, Soumia Cheref, and Regina Miranda

Do Social Constraints Always Hurt? Acculturation Moderates the Relationships Between Social
Constraints and Physical Symptoms of Chinese American Breast Cancer Survivors

Celia Ching Yee Wong and Qian Lu

The Effects of Racism-Related Stress on Asian Americans: Anxiety and Depression Among Different
Generational Statuses

Charles M. Liu and Karen L. Suyemoto


Read about the last issue of AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/2016/03/14/aajp-vol7no1/.
For more information on AAJP: http://aapaonline.org/publications/asian-american-journal-of-psychology/.
Contact: Bryan S. K. Kim, Ph.D., Editor, Asian American Journal of Psychology, bryankim@hawaii.edu